Bad Wolves’ Doc Coyle On Tommy Vext Drama: “A Big Portion Of The Fanbase Has Essentially Been Radicalized Against The Band Under False Pretenses”

Former Bad Wolves frontman Tommy Vext recently made headlines after filing a lawsuit against Better Noise CEO and band manager Allen Kovac. Now, during an episode of his “The Ex-Man With Doc Coyle,” Bad Wolves guitarist Doc Coyle shared his thoughts on the situation.

Coyle said the following:

“He [Tommy Vext] filed a lawsuit. Keep in mind, I’m not involved in any of this shit. All right? I’m not in the band business. I’m not on the record label, so I’m not involved in lawsuits, no one’s suing me. I mean, not yet [laughs]. But like I don’t own anything with the band. And so it’s like so I hear about this shit all like secondhand.

…So this article comes out on TMZ, and it’s basically like a press release for him. I’m like damn, you could just do that with TMZ? They’ll just kind of like, filter your talking points as if it’s an actual story? And then our label owner/manager, Allen Kovac, he put out a statement, kind of refuting some of the stuff that seems like a really frivolous lawsuit, you know? And I’m being a little bit more outspoken about this stuff.

Everything I can’t talk about right now—and I’d like to be more open with it—because, like I said, I think, you know the reason why Allen made a statement is because you’re just saying things that are not true. And I think you have that you have this weird kind of no-win situation when you’re dealing with someone who’s a troll, or just trolls in general.

Because a troll, the way they win is by getting you to react. And when your kind of day-to-day thing is drama, and having something… It’s like playing tennis right? Like I need someone to hit the ball back. So you’re in the situation where if you say nothing. Yeah, I mean you’re taking the high road and there’s, there’s elements of that that’s good.

But if someone says something about you that’s false and that is damaging to your reputation, it’s difficult not to respond that takes a lot of willpower. But then there’s also the element of sometimes certain charges against you are so ridiculous by even acknowledging it, you’re almost giving it oxygen. So that’s a really tough balancing act we have to figure out.

And so we haven’t been that that open was stuff because we’ve been advised not to say anything. But I think that’s going to start changing. And I think it’s important because our fanbase, or a big portion of the fanbase has essentially been radicalized against the band under false pretenses.

And that’s, that’s a real thing, you know, I don’t know how many people it is, I mean who knows, who knows how many fucking people see the bullshit on Instagram every day. It’s probably like 20-30% of the people that follow him and maybe less, I don’t know, we really just don’t know.

And so we can do is go out there and out the music and promote it, get it out there and just hope people like it. And I’m really confident in the record, I think it’s phenomenal. And hopefully that’s what actually matters in this situation is music.

The songs man, man. I mean, you think about your favorite bands and those that how magical it is right? And that’s all we want to do I think as creators and being part of this thing like this… anything like this that you make things that last and affect people.

And I don’t want to be deal with this shit. I don’t want to be in a war, a war of words, a feud, shit is wack. I play music because it’s fun. this That shit is not fun, but that’s the point. The point is to wear you down, it is to make it a war of attrition that is so belabor that you’ll give up. And I look at these situations as a test of one’s will.

Will wins out, you know. It’s a tough one to say like, you go through the gauntlet, but you’re not happy… and it’s just like sometimes people do something they are fighting just to win. And they’re doing it for so long by the time they go through it, they forget they were being fighting for. I’m someone, I don’t really care about fame. I don’t really care much about money.

I don’t want to not have money but I’m not like, I don’t have that thing in my heart that’s like I need to go make $80 million, like I just, I don’t know, it’s just not, it’s in. Listen, I don’t wanna be broke. I definitely want to do well in life, but it’s not my main motivator.

I just want to do cool things things and try and do right by people and I don’t know, just be part of positive inertia. And I feel like if you do the right things, the money will take care of itself.

And we’ll see how that turns out.”

[via The PRP]

Doc Coyle Reveals That God Forbid Have A Tour Offer, Says He Wants Olly Steele To Play Second Guitar For The Band If They Reunite

During a recent episode of his “The Ex-Man With Doc Coyle” podcast, Doc Coyle (Bad Wolves) revealed that his old band God Forbid recently received a tour offer. It is still unclear if the band will take the deal, but if they do, ex-Monuments guitarist Olly Steele has already been offered a chance to take part in the reunion as a replacement for Dallas Coyle.

The following exchange took place on the aforementioned podcast [via The PRP]

Doc Coyle: “So God Forbid has been getting some offers for tours and reunions and stuff—and I don’t even know if it’ll happen or not—but if it does happen, would Olly Steele be down to play second guitar in God Forbid, if it happened?”

Olly Steele: “Are you shitting me?”

Doc Coyle: “No, I’m not shitting you.”

Olly Steele: “Where’s Dallas?…”

Doc Coyle: “Dallas… He’s done with me. He had his run and now he’s done.”

Olly Steele: “I can’t think of anything that would be more fun… If I’m free. I’m not saying I’d never be in a band again, you know.”

Doc Coyle: “If you’re down to do it… The thing about it, it’s not even really being in a band. It’ll probably be some shows and maybe a tour. But there’s nothing crazy, we’d probably take it one step at a time.

And like I said, I don’t even know if the other guys want to do it. I think we’re supposed to have a conference call, kinda talk to everyone and see what the vibe is. But we have a tour offer right now, for a European tour, which I don’t know if we’re gonna do or not.

But it just kinda seems like things have come around and there’s renewed interest in the band. And if I was gonna get someone, you’d be the guy I want to get. So I thought I’d ask you here.”

Olly Steele: “That’s amazing, 1000% yes.”

Doc Coyle: “Awesome, alright now I’m excited. I thought you’d say yes.”

Olly Steele: “You’re excited? I was 15-16-years-old playing guitar for the first time and learning from you and Dallas, and this has just happened, that’s amazing.”

Doc Coyle: “Well, I can’t have anymore white people in the band alright? [laughs].”

Olly Steele: “It’s a shame that it may not be the original lineup, BUT, let’s fucking play “Into The Wasteland” seven times in a row.”

Doc Coyle On The Possibility Of A God Forbid Reunion: “I Would Say It Is A Matter Of When, Not If”

While answering fan questions on his “The Ex-Man With Doc Coyle” podcast, Doc Coyle addressed the possibility of a God Forbid reunion. He said the following:

“I think yes. I think [it’s] just a matter of how and when. The logistics… It’s just not easy because guys are all over the place, guys have children, they have jobs, they have wives, they have obligations and it’s not the easiest thing to put together. It’s interesting, we were getting a lot of this additional interest during the pandemic… My main priority is Bad Wolves and so I have to organize everything around that. I would say it’s just baby steps so we’ll see, try and make it work. I would say it is a matter of when, not if, but then again I don’t want to hype people up because it’s just gotta be correct. Everything’s gotta work out.”

[via The PRP]

Watch Pro-Shot Footage Of Metallica, Ugly Kid Joe, Etc. Members Covering Billy Idol’s “White Wedding”

On July 26, 2019, Kirk Hammett (Metallica), Robert Trujillo (Metallica), Whitfield Crane (Ugly Kid Joe, etc.), Joey Castillo (ex-Queens Of The Stone Age, etc.), and Doc Coyle (Bad Wolves) played a special covers set as “The Wedding Band” at the Cosmopolitan Music Hall in Richmond Hill, ON. Now, some pro-shot footage of the group performing a cover of Billy Idol’s “White Wedding” during the show has been shared online:

Bad Wolves On Parting Ways With Tommy Vext: “This Is Not About Cancel Culture”

Bad Wolves guitarist Doc Coyle and drummer John Boecklin have further discussed their decision to part ways with frontman Tommy Vext during a recent livestream. According to them, “it was just past the point of going back” and the split was “not about cancel culture.”

Boecklin said the following:

“It’s sad to say that we had to part ways, or that he left, or that he was fired, whatever. Like, fuck all that shit. It’s just something that had to take its course like this. It was just past the point of going back. We understand where any fan would come from. ‘What’s this band without Tommy?’ or whatever, we understand it. But we’re here and we’re going to write the sickest record that we’ve ever done with a new guy and you can take it or leave it. Not as, like, a threat or anything, it’s just kinda like, you know, we’re here to just do business as usual. We’re musicians and that’s all we’ve ever done. Now we’re just going to push forward.”

“And it’s like ‘Is this about politics?’ ‘Is this about this and that?’ Right now, what we would like to say is this is not about cancel culture, in what has transpired with the band. Doc has had his political views since I’ve known him. Since, fuck, when we first met in 2004. Tommy definitely became much, much, much more of a political person in the light of COVID when that hit.

However, they were still managing since the band began, if he had these ways or whatever. So it’s not all about canceling someone over some bullshit. We have too much to hold on to cancel someone over their political beliefs of anything. So I want to keep certain words out of it and all that crap and I know I sound like I’m being vague and cryptic, I’m not trying to be. I’m just not trying to be a drama bitch that’s just letting everything bleed out. We want the best for everyone who was and is in this band.”

Coyle added:

“And, kinda to that point, I just want to say, we live in very divisive times right now, where whatever is going on kind of in the big picture is really turning friend against friend, family member against family member. And, to me, music, heavy metal, rock and roll, hardcore, punk, was about overcoming our differences, you know? And, it’s like, you go to a Metallica show, and is it about what political party you’re from? Or is it like, we’re all going to sing along to ‘Creeping Death‘? The whole point of it is that we want to put forward a more inclusive idea that, I don’t care, I REALLY do not care who you support, where you’re coming from, it’s about the music.”

“Ultimately, that’s the thing that matters. And I have family members that disagree with me on certain things and friends. That’s not the most important thing to me. It’s not. I would never, ‘I don’t want to talk to you cuz you believe…’ No! I’m not about that. At all. So I just want to set that straight. That’s not how it is. I just think we need to, we need to as a band, set a standard of casting a wide net and saying everyone’s welcome here. And that’s something… that’s just a value that I hold true.”

Boecklin continued:

“I mean, I will say that the band did kind of feel, to express how much this isn’t about cancel culture. The band definitely…Tommy’s views are very strong and very outspoken and out there. Where the band was being perceived, sort of, a certain way. As being extreme right wing. And we still, we would’ve and did…I would hang out with Tommy all the time recording this third record. Which is going to be a different thing now, but I would never speak of anything he posted about.

I would always try to disconnect from that and just remain being friends. I would never talk politics with him….I would just let him use that part of his life to get what he wanted out of it and express how me and him… we never had one political argument. Ever. I promised myself I wouldn’t say ‘politics’ in this, but I did. I’m just saying, it’s not about cancel culture once again.”

It’s worth noting that Vext’s departure came after he continued to make headlines for his right-wing and conspiracy theory beliefs, including his controversial takes on racism. It also comes after the vocalist was accused of domestic violence by his ex-girlfriend Whitney Johns, who has since been granted a two-year domestic violence restraining order against him. Vext claimed those allegations were part of an “extortion attempt” and that he had been exonerated. The singer is now planning to start a solo career and says there is “no animosity” between him and the band.

[via Metal Injection]

Rock/Metal Musicians React To Pro-Trump Rioters Storming The Capitol

As you are probably well aware of by now, pro-Trump rioters stormed the Capitol in Washington, D.C. earlier today (January 6) as lawmakers were counting the Electoral College votes to officially certify President-elect Joe Biden’s win. A number of rock/metal musicians have since taken to social media to comment on the insurrection, which was spurred by Trump himself. You can find some of the various reactions below:

Paul Stanley (KISS):

Tom Morello (Rage Against The Machine):

Mark Morton (Lamb Of God):

Tommy Lee (Mötley Crüe):

Andy Biersack (Black Veil Brides):

Robb Flynn (Machine Head):

Otep:

Alex Skolnick (Testament):

Noodles (The Offspring):

Ice-T (Body Count):

Tom DeLonge (ex-Blink 182):

Dino Cazares (Fear Factory):

Doc Coyle (Bad Wolves):

Mike Portnoy (ex-Dream Theater, etc.):

Sacred Reich:

Breaking Benjamin, Bad Wolves, Nothing More, Etc. Members Share Quarantine Cover Of A Perfect Circle’s “Judith”

Sterling Jackson (Vagus Nerve), Doc Coyle (Bad Wolves), Mark Vollelunga (Nothing More), Aaron Bruch (Breaking Benjamin), and Meytal Cohen have teamed up for a quarantine cover of A Perfect Circle’s “Judith.” You can check that out below:

Byzantine, Five Finger Death Punch, Bad Wolves, Etc. Members Share Quarantine Cover Of Metallica’s “The Shortest Straw”

Chris “OJ” Ojeda (Byzantine) has joined forces with Phil Demmel (Vio-lence, ex-Machine Head), Doc Coyle (Bad Wolves, etc.), Chris Kale (Five Finger Death Punch), and Mike Portnoy (ex-Dream Theater, etc.) for a quarantine cover of Metallica‘s “The Shortest Straw.” You can check that out below:

Ojeda commented:

“Chris [Kael] and I have discussed working on something over the past few years since we are old friends. When I mentioned a Metallica cover during this time of restriction, he jumped at the chance. He was able to bring Mike [Portnoy] on board pretty quickly and I pulled Doc [Coyle] and Phil [Demmel] in.

I have been musically dormant since the release of ‘The Cicada Tree‘, spending time raising my 3 kids and building Trident Music Facility, so it feels GREAT to track some guitars and vocals again. ‘The Shortest Straw‘ is quite possibly a perfect Metallica song. I am a piece of driftwood in a sea of Gold performing this classic tune with these fantastic musicians! We hope you enjoy.”

Bad Wolves Guitarist Doc Coyle On Frontman Tommy Vext’s Controversial Black Lives Matter Post “I Wholeheartedly Disagree With The Content Of This Video”

Bad Wolves’ Tommy Vext recently made headlines after posting a controversial video in which he discussed a conspiracy theory regarding the ongoing Black Lives Matter movement and seemed to suggest that racism is “manufactured.” However, the frontman soon followed up with a statement saying his comments were “widely misunderstood” Now, Bad Wolves guitarist Doc Coyle has commented on the situation.

Coyle said the following:

“I have been uncharacteristically quiet with regard to the Instagram video & backlash to said video about Black Lives Matter recently released by Bad Wolves singer, Tommy Vext. While it should be noted that I advocate for free speech & don’t want to censor anyone, I wholeheartedly disagree with the content of this video.

I speak for & represent myself. Thankfully, today Tommy offered a retraction/clarification on his thoughts on the matter & the video has been deleted. That means a lot to me. Some people agree & that’s ok. Some people disagree & that’s ok. But I apologize to anyone who was hurt.

Some in the media will exploit this as a flashy band-feud, but Tommy & I have spoken. We’ve heard each other, & that’s what this time should be about. Listening to one another. If he & I can disagree & be in a band together, then we as a count, or society can find a way to find common ground despite ideological differences.

But we can’t do that if we are talking past each other. I’m not an activist. I’m not a civil rights leader. But I offer solidarity to those addressing historical and systemic racial inequities in this country.

Public band squabbles are bad for business, but if I didn’t make my voice heard about an issue pertaining to my own band, then I have no credibility to speak on other social issues that are important to me. I would be letting fear get the best of me.

I want to put the focus back on music, not politics. This is a distraction from what we are here to do — create, perform, & engage. It may sound corny, but I want our message to be one of inclusion & positivity because that’s what I truly believe in.

Thank you,

Doc Coyle”

Comments Off on Bad Wolves Guitarist Doc Coyle On Frontman Tommy Vext’s Controversial Black Lives Matter Post “I Wholeheartedly Disagree With The Content Of This Video” Posted in Bad Wolves, News Tagged , , ,

Body Count, Trivium, Fit For An Autopsy, Etc. Members To Take Part In “We Can Do Better: Words From The Underground” Charity Event

Will Putney (Fit For An Autopsy, END) has announced a special livestreamed charity event for the American Civil Liberties Union. The virtual event, which is being called “We Can Do Better: Words From The Underground,” will take place on June 14 at 9am PDT/12pm EDT and it will find musicians, labels, producers, etc. taking part in discussions and various giveaways.

The following participants have been confirmed:

  • Ice-T (Body Count)
  • Keith Buckley (Every Time I Die)
  • Bryan Garris (Knocked Loose)
  • Matt Heafy (Trivium)
  • Kurt Ballou (Converge, God City)
  • Andrew Marsh (Thy Art Is Murder)
  • Tom Williams (Stray From The Path)
  • Scott Vogel (Terror)
  • Todd Jones (Nails)
  • Buddy Nielson (Senses Fail)
  • Alan Day and Dan O’Connor (Four Year Strong)
  • Josh Smith (Northlane)
  • Doc Coyle (Bad Wolves, God Forbid)
  • Anthony Martini (E-Town Concrete, Commission)
  • Patrick Sheridan (Fit For An Autopsy)
  • Brendan Garrone (Incendiary)
  • James Pligge (Harms Way)
  • Brendan Murphy (Counterparts, END)
  • Ethan Harrison (Great American Ghost)
  • Mark Lewis (Producer)
  • Anthony DiDio (Vein)
  • Monte Conner (Nuclear Blast)
  • Justin Louden (Closed Casket Activities)
  • Carl Severson (Ferret, Good Fight Music)
  • Equal Vision Records
  • Pure Noise Records
  • Nuclear Blast
  • Relapse Records
  • Closed Casket Activities
  • Good Fight Entertainment
  • Ferret Records
  • Liquid Metal
  • Metal Injection
  • Evil Greed

Putney commented:

“To be honest I was initially torn about doing this. The distaste and rage I have for our systemic issues in this country are more palpable than they ever have been. But I am NOT the voice of the oppressed, and I would never pretend to be.

What I can do is sit down with my fellow artists, friends, peers, and heroes alike and start a conversation about what we CAN do to support institutions for positive change, because something HAS to change. And the money that will roll in from this event will go to the experts. The ACLU. The Civil Rights organization that has fought for the purest form of free speech, justice, and equality for ONE HUNDRED YEARS (let one hundred years sink in for a second). The work that they are heavily involved in today aims to tackle these systemic issues.

The artists who will appear on this livestream come from different corners of life, different upbringings, different tax brackets. Naturally, some people are more comfortable expressing their opinions and beliefs to the public than others. I ask that you do not expect fire and brimstone from everyone, and do not scorn those who’d like to have a lighthearted conversation about music. The act of participating and donating sought after items to a worthy charity should be enough for you to understand their intentions.

This raffle will be one for the books. Extremely rare items, tons of merch, test presses and limited vinyl, music gear, it goes on and on. A lot of those involved are bringing something special and I truly thank them for parting with sacred items.

The link is live to start donating now. We will be announcing more details and giveaways soon.

http://www.soundrink.live

If you’d like to participate on any level just message me.

Go big or go home.”