Dez Fafara (DevilDriver, Coal Chamber) Says Metal Bands Should Start Releasing New Albums More Frequently

Dez Fafara (DevilDriver, Coal Chamber) recently guested on “The Metal Teddy Bear Experience” for 90.3 WMSC and he offered his thoughts on the current state of metal and why he feels artists should release new albums more frequently. You can listen to the full interview and read some excerpts (transcribed by Blabbermouth) below:

Fafara said the following when asked if DevilDriver will do a 15th anniversary show or tour for their debut album:

“No, man. I don’t look at the rear-view [mirror]. That’s part and parcel to keeping yourself relevant and keeping a career going. You don’t look at the rear-view until it’s time to look at the rear-view, and right now is not the time to look into the rear-view. We’re releasing this record [‘Outlaws ‘Til The End: Vol. 1’). We’re in the studio right now recording 25 songs for a double record that’s gonna be a double-album concept record staggered release. So you’re gonna get a release every 15 to 18 months from DEVILDRIVER from here on out in my career. Part of the reason is that a lot of people are really saying, ‘Hey, not a lot of people are going to heavy metal shows anymore. Heavy metal’s not selling. Metal and rock are taking a big hit,’ which is true. So, if you leave a plant and you don’t water it — you water it every four years, five years, make a record every four or five years — don’t you think that plant’s gonna die? So, what I’m saying to everybody in the scene right now is if you make a record every three, four, five years, you need to kick it up, get with me, get it every 15 months to two years, start building this scene back up. All of us, all of us are responsible. So that’s what DEVILDRIVER is doing now, and I’m making a concerted effort to kick it up. I mean, I don’t know how old you are, but when I was young, I got a record a year from my favorite bands, and sometimes two records a year from KISS.”

He also added the following when asked about singles and EPs:

“No. I think singles and EPs are a total waste of time — they go completely unrecognized. You get one or two songs, three songs, [the fans] listen for a week or two and then they’re done. But for some reason, when the get a record of seven or eight songs, they live with it for a year, year and a half. It’s the craziest thing. And you can see it in sales. Bands that released EPs, you go look at sales, nobody buys them. You add five songs to that, it’s a [full-length] record, everybody buys it. Why is that? It’s a strange, strange thing happening in music right now. But I’m staying way, way from releasing singles, releasing EPs — I’m staying way away from that; that’s not where we need to go at all. Make music, right? What’s the problem? Why can’t you create eight, nine, 10, 11 songs once every 15 [to] 18 months. What is the problem? Why are bands having a hard time getting 12 songs out every three to four years? What is the deal? I can’t fathom it. I wrote two songs this morning before most people were awake. That’s what a musician does. I mean, it’s okay, man. I don’t mind stepping on everybody’s toes who’s listening to me right now because ya’ll need to kick it up. Y’all need to kick it up, we all need to help this scene, we all need to foster our scene, we all need to be part of our scene and to be part of it, you’ve gotta start kicking in, releasing records. And it’s the same thing for the newer, younger bands — they’re doing the same thing too; a record every three years. You think you’re gonna get a career out of that? Nah. That’s why so many bands are, like, ‘Oh, they came up. Oh, where’d they go?’ Well, you haven’t heard from ’em. They released a record three years later [and] no one cared. Here’s the thing: a kid goes into high school, freshman year, gets a great record, falls in love with the band, wears the t-shirt daily. Doesn’t get another record until he graduates? Don’t you think that’s ridiculous? That’s where we’re at right now, and I’m pointing the finger. And it’s time to kick it up.”

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Dez Fafara Shares More Previews From DevilDriver’s “Outlaws Til’ The End” Covers Album

Dez Fafara has continued to post previews of some of the tracks featured on DevilDriver‘s outlaw country covers album “Outlaws Til’ The End: Vol. 1.“ You can check out snippets of their cover of David Allan Coe’s “The Ride” feat. Lee Ving (Fear), their cover of Richard Thompson’s “Dad’s Gonna Kill Me” feat. Burton C. Bell (Fear Factory) and their cover of Hank Williams Jr.’s “A Country Boy Can Survive” below. The album will be released on July 6.

Featuring @bcb_eye ! #DevilDriver JULY 6

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The Ride part 2 #outlawstiltheend #DevilDriver #MetalCover

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DevilDriver Premiere Lyric Video For Their Cover Of Steve Earle‘s “Copperhead Road“ Feat. Brock Lindow (36 Crazyfists)

DevilDriver have premiered a lyric video for their cover of Steve Earle‘s “Copperhead Road.“ This track features Brock Lindow (36 Crazyfists) and it will appear on the band’s outlaw country covers album “Outlaws Til’ The End: Vol. 1″ (out July 6).

Dez Fafara commented:

“I have always loved this story of running moonshine and running from the cops, and having Brock on this song was a smart move as his unique voice is absolutely perfect for it. I’m proud to have him on this record!”

Lindow added:

“I’m grateful to be included in the barnburner that is ‘Outlaws ‘Til The End: Vol. 1’! ‘Copperhead Road’ was always a heavy song with a great story that encompasses all things ‘outlaw,’ but DevilDriver ups the ante on this one and puts the pedal to metal with their vision of the legendary jam. It was a tremendous honor to sing with Dez and the boys on this monster record!”

DevilDriver Tease Cover Of Steve Earle‘s “Copperhead Road“ Feat. Brock Lindow (36 Crazyfists)

Dez Fafara has shared a preview of DevilDriver’s cover of Steve Earle‘s “Copperhead Road.“ The track features Brock Lindow (36 Crazyfists) and it will appear on the band’s outlaw country covers album “Outlaws Til’ The End: Vol. 1″ (out July 6).

Dez Fafara Previews More Of The Tracks Featured On DevilDriver’s “Outlaws Til’ The End” Covers Album

Dez Fafara has been posting previews of some of the tracks featured on DevilDriver‘s outlaw country covers album “Outlaws Til’ The End: Vol. 1.“ You can check those out below. The album will be released on July 6.

[via The PRP]

DevilDriver Premiere New Video For Their Cover Of Johnny Cash’s “Ghost Riders In The Sky” Feat. Randy Blythe (Lamb Of God), John Carter Cash, & Ana Cristina Cash

DevilDriver have premiered a new in-studio video for their cover of Johnny Cash‘s version of “Ghost Riders In The Sky,“ via Billboard. The track features Randy Blythe (Lamb Of God), as well as Johnny Cash‘s son John Carter Cash and his wife Ana Cristina Cash. DevilDriver‘s new outlaw country covers album “Outlaws ‘Til The End: Vol. 1“ will be released on July 6.

DevilDriver vocalist Dez Fafara said the following:

“It was both an honor and a privilege to work with these three great artists. Watching John Carter Cash and Ana Cristina Cash track vocals at the Cash Cabin was a highlight of my career. Meeting such down-to-earth and incredibly talented people and having them come on board “made” the project for me, personally. Tracking with Randy was another highlight. He’s a brother and watching how he tracked, and vice versa, was a learning process for both of us that we both spoke highly about and enjoyed immensely. All of us on this song gave 110% to make sure it was done right! Enjoy!”

John Carter Cash also commented:

“All my life I have loved the power and eerie quality of the song ‘Ghost Riders In The Sky‘. Since I was nine years old, I have lived and breathed heavy metal music. I am grateful to have had the chance to work with Dez Fafara, Randy Blythe, DevilDriver and others, in the upcoming release of what I believe is the consummate metal version of this musical masterpiece.”

Ana Cristina Cash continued:

“I am so proud to have been a part of ‘Outlaws ‘Til The End: Vol. 1‘ and to have sung on the metal version of ‘Ghost Riders In The Sky‘ with my husband John Carter Cash, Dez Fafara, Randy Blythe and DevilDriver. This whole album pushes boundaries and merges the outlaw country and the metal genres in a masterful way.”

Lamb Of God‘s Randy Blythe also added:

“I am a huge fan of moody songs with narrative lyrics employed to tell a dark story – they really make the listener visualize what the song is about. I can’t think of many tunes where this was done more effectively than Johnny Cash‘s version of ‘Ghost Riders In The Sky‘. Long before heavy metal had been invented, the original Man in Black wasn’t afraid to explore the dark side with his music. Truly great songs never die – they just shape-shift through the years. Singing with Dez, John Carter, and DevilDriver is keeping those undead riders alive in a whole different genre. Crank this up and look to the sky at night…”

Fafara also told Billboard the following about a possible follow-up to the effort:

“When people started to hear about this, man, I got a lot of phone calls, I mean a ton, from some very big band and big guys in big bands who wanted to be part of it. So I said, ‘We’d better slap a Vol. 1 on this.’ I’m not looking forward to trying to tackle this or bite this off again, but it looks like it might come to fruition ’cause of the amount of guests who contacted us. This thing was difficult and I’m glad we’re on the other end of it but, yeah, I’m sure we’ll go do it again at some point.”

DevilDriver Seem To Have Started Pre-Production For Their New Album

It looks like DevilDriver have started pre-production for their new album. Guitarist Michael Spreitzer revealed the news in the below Instagram post. Frontman Dez Fafara previously said the effort will be a double album. However, before that surfaces, the group will release a new outlaw country covers album, titled “Outlaws ‘Til The End: Vol. 1,“ on July 6.

Day 2 of prepro doing it the old school way. 12 more days to go.

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