Celtic Frost’s Tom Gabriel Fischer Pens Obituary For Late Bandmate Martin Eric Ain

Tom Gabriel Fischer has penned an obituary for his late Celtic Frost, etc. bandmate Martin Eric Ain. You can read that below. Ain passed away at the age of 50 after having an apparent heart attack.

Here’s what Fischer had to say:

“I have had to draft a disconcerting number of obituaries in recent years, mourning the loss of individuals who were either very close to me or of distinct importance to my life. But this obituary is by far the most difficult one to write.

Because Martin Eric Ain was unique beyond any description.

Martin was a part of me, and I was a part of him. Our lives were intertwined in a symbiosis that, at times, almost resembled a marriage, and yet our relationship was of an intricate nature and frequently fraught by disagreements. We both had a substantial impact on the development of each other’s path, and we both owed the escape from the fetters of the environment that defined our teenage years to each other’s existence.

I first met Martin around the time Hellhammer recorded the Triumph Of Death demo in 1983, when Steve Warrior and I would spend our Saturday nights at the then popular “Heavy Metal discos”. One of these events was called Quo Vadis, and it took place where Martin‘s lived, in the village of Wallisellen, Switzerland. When I interviewed him for my second book, In September of 2007, Martin recalled:

“The first time I saw Tom and Steve Warrior, they were part of a group of four or five metal fans, headbanging in unison while the non-metal crowd stood around them in a circle, staring. They walked as a leather-clad wall, and everybody got out of their way. It radiated power and violence, and I was extremely impressed.

We were in awe of these guys. They had arrived wearing sunglasses, and their jackets were covered with logos and patches of obscure bands which we had never heard of. They wore boots, leather jackets, bullet belts, studded armbands, and even studded gaiters.

They all had long hair and were three or four years older than us and therefore obviously further along than we were. It totally blew our minds. It was like seeing members of Motörhead or Judas Priest standing in front of us. They looked like an album cover.

All of a sudden, there was a radical band within our field of existence. My parents were scared that Tom would seduce us into a life of alcohol abuse, drugs, and other illegal activities. They never recognized the actual threat which emanated from him. Just like so many people, they failed to recognize the power of this music.

They perceived heavy metal as some asinine phase, as mere noise; they thought that nobody would ever take any of this seriously. They completely missed the fact that the music led to a radicalization inside of me and to the desire to define my life with music.”

Martin and I soon began to develop a close friendship. We spent uncounted nights discovering music together, discussing books, history, religion, occultism, or art, and then one of us would have to either bicycle or walk home to his own village, through pitch black forests at some ungodly hour. Martin‘s intelligence, horizon, and vision were truly remarkable.

I suppose it was only a question of time before we would begin to create music together, but Martin initially lacked the confidence and hesitated. Instead, he adopted the alias of “Mart Jeckyl” and began to support Hellhammer in a managerial role, supplying us with memos that detailed how we could improve our concept, image, and lyrics. He was only 16 at the time!

By the time Hellhammer produced the final demo that resulted in our first record deal, Martin was a co-author of some of our lyrics and sang some backing vocals on it. And then he finally became the bassist for good. The development of the group became fierce, and only five months later, we felt the need to drastically expand the scope of our alliance by starting from scratch, with a new project. This was the birth of Celtic Frost, during the night from May 31 to June 1, 1984.

Martin was one of the very few people who were prepared to embark on this journey with me, uncompromisingly and against significant opposition, unlike many others who only supplied hollow talk and then withered away. Completely self-thought, Martin became a superb and vastly original bassist with an almost uncanny ability to learn songs very quickly.

And even though he initially wrote hardly any music, his many other contributions to the group were just as important. Celtic Frost‘s uniqueness depended heavily on our creative collaboration, as I would inadvertently – and foolishly – prove a few years later.

In the course of the 34 years we knew each other, we would jointly experience and survive just about any situation one might be able to imagine, not least the destruction of Celtic Frost – twice!

The partnership with Martin Eric Ain was instrumental in enabling me to fulfil my ardent teenage dream of becoming a musician. Determining Martin‘s own deeper motivation to pursue this quest is more difficult, however. I think his was more a sense of rebellion against the surroundings in which he grew up, and once this was accomplished, the musical path no longer had the same importance to him.

He subsequently became a very intuitive and thriving entrepreneur and embarked on ventures that often were blatantly at odds with the values he so fervently stood for during his youth.

It was much the same after we reunited Celtic Frost in 2001, recorded the triumphant Monotheist album, and toured the world. Whereas Martin had initially agreed with me that the reunion would be a long-term venture, he confided to me towards the end of the tour that he felt we had sufficiently proven ourselves, and that he did not see a necessity for another album, at least not in the foreseeable future.

Moreover, he was weary of the strains of touring and maintaining a band in a vastly changed modern musical landscape versus the comparatively comfortable and lucrative life he led in Zurich managing clubs and bars. His attention was already elsewhere, and I realized that the reunion for him, again, had served a different purpose.

Martin had a complex personality, coloured by contradictions and indulgence (and I am sure he would describe me exactly the same). He frequently accused me of exorbitance (and undoubtedly had a point), and yet he himself pursued immoderation, if on different levels. He knew, of course, and once labelled his acquisitiveness “pathological”.

He resorted to verboseness to mask insecurities and his discomfort about revealing too much about his emotions. He was the best and most amazingly generous friend anybody could wish for, as those fortunate enough to know him closely will confirm. And yet, in an interview published in Switzerland in January of 2010, he himself asserted: “I don’t like people who embark on ego trips that end up hurting others, although I cannot deny being guilty of exactly such behaviour.”

He would often choose the path of least resistance or refrain from taking a side instead of acting decisively to quench the mounting band-internal conflicts. He watched Celtic Frost‘s protracted and painful self-destruction, only to tell me, a month after my exit from the group, that if he would have spoken up, the band could have been saved.

But by that time, Martin had grown so tired of the dysfunctional group that I became convinced he was secretly relieved that I left, because it spared him of having to quit himself. But I often had the feeling that part of him felt a nagging sense of guilt ever since.

I am no stranger to the passing of a beloved human being, and death itself is not an abstract or intimidating concept to me. But the fact that a friend of such profound significance has irrevocably been taken from his life is exceptionally painful. I am very glad that I instigated the Celtic Frost reunion in 2001, and that I thus was granted to experience Martin as a newly mature and astonishingly capable musician and songwriter.

Notwithstanding the strenuous work involved, touring the world with him one final time was a privilege. In fact, every minute spent in Martin‘s company was a privilege, and this includes our last meeting over coffee, a short time before his death.

Martin‘s passing affects me deeply. The world will never be the same without him. His death signifies the end of an era, both for our music and on a profoundly personal level. I, the older one, had always subconsciously expected him to survive me and become the custodian of the legacy we created together. The shock about his untimely death, the pain, and the sense of loneliness and loss are unbearable and insurmountable.

Martin, I will miss you deeply until my days, too, will come to an end.

– Tom Gabriel Fischer“

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Ex-Celtic Frost Bassist Martin Eric Ain Dead At 50

Ex-Celtic Frost bassist Martin Eric Ain has passed away at the age of 50, as a result of an apparent heart attack. His friend Jan Graber confirmed the news to 20 Minuten, saying Ain “suddenly collapsed when he switched to a different tram.” His former Celtic Frost bandmate Tom Gabriel Fischer commented:

“I am deeply affected by his passing. Our relationship was very complex and definitely not free of conflicts, but Martin‘s life and mine were very closely intertwined, since we first met in 1982.”

Thomas Gabriel Fischer Doesn’t Endorse Upcoming Celtic Frost Reissues

It was previously revealed that Celtic Frost’s Noise Records albums (“Morbid Tales”, “To Mega Therion”, “Into The Pandemonium”, and “Vanity/Nemesis”) were set to be reissued on remastered deluxe hardback CD and 180-gram double album sets on June 30. Now, Thomas Gabriel Fischer has revealed that he is not endorsing the re-releases in a lengthy blog post, which you can read below.

Fischer’s post:

“There must be some significance to the fact that as the events described below unfolded, we passed the 30th anniversary of Celtic Frost finishing work on the group’s Into The Pandemonium album – the album, not least, which was at the centre of the most significant disagreements between Celtic Frost and label Noise Records in 1987. These events would eventually lead to the disintegration of Celtic Frost by the end of that year and have a direct bearing on anything that subsequently transpired.

In February of 1984, Martin Eric Ain and I, as members of Hellhammer, signed our first recording contract with Noise Records. We came from small Swiss villages and were young and lacked experience. Moreover, Switzerland was a country without a real metal scene at the time, rendering it near impossible for us to glean any kind of expertise from other bands that might have been active on an international level.

And even if the possibility to gain any such information would have existed, Hellhammer wasn’t an accepted entity by any means. Moreover, while there were a few music industry attorneys in Switzerland, they worked in the “real” music scene, and we were too insignificant and destitute to be able to establish any actual communication with them.

Noise Records were of course fully aware of all of these circumstances.

So we signed the record contract, delighted that our teenager dream was becoming a reality. This very dream had so far seemed completely unattainable to us in our damp, mildewed rehearsal bunker. The recording contract comprised things such as the publishing rights to our songs, and we didn’t have the slightest idea of the true, enormous significance of such terms. The text sounded professional and it definitely resembled a record contract, but it actually overwhelmed us. Due to Martin’s age, his parents were required to sign as well; that they were actually doing this served as some kind of additional confirmation that everything was as it should be.

A few months later, the recording contract was transferred to the newly formed Celtic Frost. And as Celtic Frost gradually grew more popular, we became more experienced and increasingly encountered individuals who were long-standing music industry professionals, enabling us more and more to comprehend what we had signed. The rights to the music we were creating belonged to Noise Records practically indefinitely, even after our passing. Moreover, the record company had, to a large extent, also secured the financial proceeds of our band, e.g. record sales, merchandising, and the aforementioned, very lucrative publishing rights. In the still fully functional music industry of the 1980s, such proceeds were quite substantial.

And if this aforementioned situation wasn’t reason enough for disagreements between an progressively mature band and the record company, the latter choose to conduct many other band related affairs in an equally uncompromising manner. Recording sessions suffered interference, album covers were altered or outright replaced, song lyrics were deleted, submitted photos and entire booklets were discarded, songs selected by us for inclusion on our albums were exchanged, concert tours were booked without our consent, video clips were cancelled, and so on. These were years of completely contradicting views, eternal conflicts, and unilateral actions.

One should note, however, that such occurrences were by no means exceptional in the music industry of the time. A number of other bands signed to the same record company experienced similar problems, as did groups signed to other labels. And even today, I frequently come across comparable stories. Additionally, we ourselves were responsible to a substantial degree for the situation we found ourselves in: it was us, after all, who had signed the contract. And we ourselves – me in particular! – committed many mistakes as well. Moreover, I certainly should not neglect to mention that the memory of Noise Records and the pioneering spirit prevailing in the scene at the time also evoke numerous positive and nostalgic feelings.

And last but not least, the events discussed above took place some 30 years ago – half an eternity, in other words. Uncounted things have taken place since; we eventually managed to extract ourselves from the affiliation with the record company, we liberated ourselves as musicians, we learned immeasurably much (often as a result of our aforementioned, sometimes substantial mistakes), we attained control over our activities, and we ultimately continued our musical path. And in doing so, we were granted numerous fantastic moments.

It is thus all a done thing, tempi passati.

Why then this rehashing of a story long since exhausted? Well, due to the longevity of certain past contractual provisions, time and again one will be confronted by their lasting effects. Years ago, Noise Records (and thus the rights to Celtic Frost’s early albums) were acquired by Rod Smallwood’s Sanctuary Music Group; said company was later absorbed by Universal Music Group, and Universal in turn sold the Noise catalogue to BMG Rights Management in London.

Last year, BMG Rights Management decided to resurrect Noise Records and reissue a substantial part of the Noise catalogue, including the classic Celtic Frost albums of the 1980s. For the reasons detailed above, we, the former members of the group, have no rights whatsoever with regard to these albums and thus lack the entitlement to exert any influence on these reissues. One must therefore give credit to BMG for voluntarily agreeing to involve me and transferring the responsibility for the art direction for these Celtic Frost albums to me.

Next to remastering, design, archive materials, and art direction, my contributions also included a number of detailed personal texts specially drafted for this new 2017 edition of the booklets of the individual albums. And this is where the past is once again catching up with Celtic Frost. It was particularly the album Into The Pandemonium which, in 1987, was created under dramatically detrimental conditions due to the increasingly pronounced disagreements between group and label. But our other albums with Noise Records were affected to some degree as well.

It is obvious that such decisive occurrences would be part of the narrative of my liner notes, and it is equally obvious that such liner notes would inevitably reflect my very personal view as somebody who was, at the time, a member of the band, wrote the songs, co-designed the visual aspects of each album, and performed and produced in the studio. And it is exactly because of these facts that the powers that be at BMG Rights Management objected.

As part of what was, at all times, an exceptionally friendly and professional exchange of thoughts with the legal counsel assigned by BMG to assess any potential legal issues, I received from London shortened versions of my liner notes, for review and approval. These were adoringly called “redlined versions”. In this particular case, however, “shortened” actually amounted to “heavily censored”. To name but one example: driven by an obvious concern about a potential lawsuit by one of the parties involved in the original 1980s releases, BMG censored and thus slashed my Into The Pandemonium liner notes to approximately a third of their original volume. What remains of my texts was utterly mutilated and thus no longer represented a coherent narrative that made any sense. These pathetic text fragments now failed to convey the full history of the individual albums.

As much as the music industry professional in me understands BMG’s concerns, it is exactly because of the events Celtic Frost endured during the 1980s that I am a radical opponent of any meddling or censorship by a record company, and that my present-day career is one hundred percent self-determined. Regardless of where one stood on the issue, the conflicts with Noise Records affected most of Celtic Frost’s activities significantly.

One could be excused for being prompted to ponder that by executing such “redlined” intrusions, BMG are, to a certain extent, reenacting the modus operandi of the label they purchased, Noise Records. As for me, I am of course not inclined whatsoever to agree to have my texts censored. I thus informed BMG that I would rather withdraw my liner notes than to see them published in disfigured guise (a variety of diversely censored drafts had been proposed to me, in an effort to break the stalemate), particularly since the events described therein have been public knowledge for many years and have also been experienced and described by other Noise Records groups.

And that’s exactly what has taken place in the meantime: in early February of 2017, I withdrew all of my dedicated liner notes for the four albums reissued by BMG: Morbid Tales, To Mega Therion, Into The Pandemonium, and Vanity/Nemesis, and politely concluded my cooperation with BMG Rights. I was thus no longer involved when the reissue project arrived at the final review and approval stage.

Throughout all of these developments, the co-founder and former bassist of Celtic Frost, Martin Eric Ain, was constantly kept in the loop.

Given this state of affairs, I no longer feel that I can endorse and support these reissues, as they no longer reflect the wishes, intentions, and identity of the band. Moreover, I personally do not view them as “official”, as none of the former members of Celtic Frost endorses them.

It had been our intention for many, many years to finally see these albums reissued in what could be called ultimate editions. It was overdue. There had even been (unsuccessful) efforts during the past decade to initiate a collaboration to that effect between our own label, Prowling Death Records, and the current holders of the rights. Unfortunately, due to the failure of this reissue project, it now seems exceedingly unlikely that such ultimate and fully band-endorsed reissues will see the light of the day during my lifetime.”

Celtic Frost’s Classic Noise-Era Albums To Be Reissued In June

Celtic Frost’s Noise Records albums (“Morbid Tales”, “To Mega Therion”, “Into The Pandemonium”, and “Vanity/Nemesis”) are set to be reissued on remastered deluxe hardback CD and 180-gram double album sets on June 30. The efforts will come with unreleased tracks, rarities, posters, and a 10-inch spine bound book. Preorders are available via PledgeMusic.

“Morbid Tales” track listing

01. Human (Intro)
02. Into The Crypts Of Rays
03. Visions Of Mortality
04. Dethroned Emperor
05. Morbid Tales
06. Procreation (Of The Wicked)
07. Return To The Eve
08. Danse Macabre
09. Nocturnal Fear

* Bonus Tracks

10. Morbid Tales (1984 Rehearsal)
11. Messiah (1984 Rehearsal)
12. Procreation (Of the Wicked) (1984 Rehearsal)
13. Nocturnal Fear (1984 Rehearsal)

“To Mega Therion” track listing:

01. Innocence And Wrath
02. The Usurper
03. Jewel Throne
04. Dawn Of Meggido
05. Eternal Summer
06. Circle Of The Tyrants
07. (Beyond The) North Winds
08. Fainted Eyes
09. Tears In A Prophet’s Dream
10. Necromantical Screams

* Bonus Tracks

11. Circle Of The Tyrants (“Emperor’s Return” EP)
12. Visual Aggression (“Emperor’s Return” EP)
13. Suicidal Winds (“Emperor’s Return” EP)
14. Journey Into Fear (“Emperor’s Return” EP Recording Sessions)
15. Visual Aggression (1988 Remix)
16. Return to the Eve (1985 Studio Jam)

“Into Pandemonium” track listing:

01. Mexican Radio
02. Mesmerized
03. Inner Sanctum
04. Tristesses De La Lune
05. Babylon Fell (Jade Serpent)
06. Caress Into Oblivion (Jade Serpent II)
07. One In Their Pride (Porthole Mix)
08. I Won’t Dance (The Elders’ Orient)
09. Rex Irae (Requiem)
10. Oriental Masquerade

* Bonus Tracks

11. Sorrows Of The Moon
12. The Inevitable Factor
13. In The Chapel In The Moonlight
14. One In Their Pride (Re-Entry Mix)
15. The Inevitable Factor (Alternate Vox)

“Vanity/Nemesis” track listing:

01. The Heart Beneath
02. Wine In My Hand (Third From The Sun)
03. Wings Of Solitude
04. The Name Of My Bride
05. This Island Earth
06. The Restless Seas
07. Phallic Tantrum
08. A Kiss Or A Whisper
09. Vanity
10. Nemesis

* Bonus Tracks

11. Heroes
12. A Descent to Babylon (Babylon Asleep)

Celtic Frost’s “Monotheist” To Be Released On Limited Edition Vinyl For 10th Anniversary

Celtic Frost‘s final album “Monotheist” is set to be reissued on limited edition vinyl for its 10th anniversary. It will be available on May 13, via Century Media, and can be preordered HERE.

Here are the various vinyl options:

“Double Black LP: Unlimited
Double Silver LP: Limited to 100 copies, exclusively available through CM Distro in Europe
Double Green LP: Limited to 200 copies, exclusively available through Nuclear Blast
Double White LP: Limited to 500 copies, exclusively available through RED and CM Distro U.S. in North America
Double Picture Disc LP: Limited to 500 copies, exclusively available through CM Distro in Europe and North America”

“Morbid Tales: A Tribute To Celtic Frost” Streaming In Full

The new Celtic Frost tribute album, Morbid Tales: A Tribute to Celtic Frost, is streaming in its entirety, via Revolver. The effort features Child Bite with Phil Anselmo, Municipal Waste, Persekutor, Acid Witch etc., and it will be released on November 13, along with the Morbid Tales: An Illustrated Tribute To Celtic Frost comic book.

Click the LINK to stream the album.

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