Scott Weiland’s Bassist Tommy Black Cleared Of Drug Possession Charges

Scott Weiland’s bassist, Tommy Black has officially been cleared of drug possession charges, after previously being arrested after police found cocaine in his area of the bus at the time of Weiland‘s death. The charges were dropped due to the fact that the narcotics could have pontentially belonged to anyone on the bus.

Deputy Bloomington Police Chief Mike Hartley issued the following statement to People:

“[The narcotics] were found in a bunk and obviously with several people residing on a bus a number of people could have potentially possessed those narcotics, so at the end of the day we decided not to pursue charges against him.”

Weiland passed away on December 3, 2015, after overdosing on cocaine, MDA and alcohol. He was 48.

Scott Weiland’s Death Was A Result Of Overdosing On Cocaine, Ecstasy & Alcohol

According to TMZ, Scott Weiland’s toxicology results are officially in. The Hennepin County Medical Examiner found that the vocalist passed away after overdosing on cocaine, MDA (ecstasy) and alcohol. This combined with his past substance abuse, heart disease, and asthma, led to him going into cardiac arrest. Weiland was found dead on his tour bus, on December 3, at the age of 48. R.I.P.

Cocaine, Xanax, Viagra, Etc. Found On Scott Weiland’s Tour Bus

According to TMZ, multiple drugs were found on late Stone Temple Pilots/Velvet Revolver frontman Scott Weiland’s bus. It was previously revealed that cocaine was present, but there was also “a generic version of Xanax, 2 different brands of sleeping pills, Buprenorphine … a synthetic opiate painkiller, and Viagra … (and) Ziprasidone … which is used to treat bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.” There was also a “green, leafy substance” as well. Weiland passed away on December 3, as a result of cardiac arrest. R.I.P.

Scott Weiland’s Ex-Wife Pens Letter On His Death/Toxicology Reports Expected In “Four to Eight Weeks”

Scott Weiland’s (ex-Stone Temple Pilots/Velvet Revolver) ex-wife Mary Forsberg Weiland has issued an open letter about his passing, which you can read below. Weiland passed away on December 3, as a result of cardiac arrest. It is unknown if drugs played a role, but Tommy Black, bassist for Weiland’s solo band The Wildabouts, was arrested for cocaine possession, after it was found in his part of the bus. According to the Minneapolis Star Tribune, Black has since been released, and a toxicology report from Weiland’s autopsy will be available in “four to eight weeks.” R.I.P.

Here’s his ex-wife’s letter, courtesy of Rolling Stone:

“December 3rd, 2015 is not the day Scott Weiland died. It is the official day the public will use to mourn him, and it was the last day he could be propped up in front of a microphone for the financial benefit or enjoyment of others. The outpouring of condolences and prayers offered to our children, Noah and Lucy, has been overwhelming, appreciated and even comforting. But the truth is, like so many other kids, they lost their father years ago. What they truly lost on December 3rd was hope.

We don’t want to downplay Scott‘s amazing talent, presence or his ability to light up any stage with brilliant electricity. So many people have been gracious enough to praise his gift. The music is here to stay. But at some point, someone needs to step up and point out that yes, this will happen again – because as a society we almost encourage it. We read awful show reviews, watch videos of artists falling down, unable to recall their lyrics streaming on a teleprompter just a few feet away. And then we click “add to cart” because what actually belongs in a hospital is now considered art.

Many of these artists have children. Children with tears in their eyes, experiencing panic because their cries go unheard. You might ask, “How were we to know? We read that he loved spending time with his children and that he’d been drug-free for years!” In reality, what you didn’t want to acknowledge was a paranoid man who couldn’t remember his own lyrics and who was only photographed with his children a handful of times in 15 years of fatherhood.

I’ve always wanted to share more than anyone was comfortable with. When writing a book years ago, it pained me to sometimes gloss over so much grief and struggle, but I did what I thought was best for Noah and Lucy. I knew they would one day see and feel everything that I’d been trying to shield them from, and that they’d eventually be brave enough to say, “That mess was our father. We loved him, but a deep-rooted mix of love and disappointment made up the majority of our relationship with him.”

Even after Scott and I split up, I spent countless hours trying to calm his paranoid fits, pushing him into the shower and filling him with coffee, just so that I could drop him into the audience at Noah’s talent show, or Lucy’s musical. Those short encounters were my attempts at giving the kids a feeling of normalcy with their dad. But anything longer would often turn into something scary and uncomfortable for them.

Spending so many years immersed in Scott‘s multiple illnesses led to my own depression; at one point, I was misdiagnosed as bipolar. I feared the same would happen to the children. There were times that Child Protective Services did not allow him to to be alone with them.

When Scott did move on to another relationship, I hoped it would inspire him to grow. I had often encouraged him to date a “normal” girl, a woman who was also a mother, someone who had the energy that I no longer had to love him. Instead, when he remarried, the children were replaced. They were not invited to his wedding; child support checks often never arrived. Our once sweet Catholic boy refused to watch the kids participate in Christmas Eve plays because he was now an atheist.

They have never set foot into his house, and they can’t remember the last time they saw him on a Father’s Day. I don’t share this with you to cast judgment, I do so because you most likely know at least one child in the same shoes. If you do, please acknowledge them and their experience. Offer to accompany them to the father-daughter dance, or teach them to throw a football. Even the bravest girl or boy will refrain from asking for something like that; they may be ashamed, or not want to inconvenience you. Just offer – or even insist if you have to.

This is the final step in our long goodbye to Scott. Even though I felt we had no other choice, maybe we never should have let him go. Or maybe these last few years of separation were his parting gift to us – the only way he could think to soften what he knew would one day crush us deep into our souls.

Over the last few years, I could hear his sadness and confusion when he’d call me late into the night, often crying about his inability to separate himself from negative people and bad choices. I won’t say he can rest now, or that he’s in a better place. He belongs with his children barbecuing in the backyard and waiting for a Notre Dame game to come on. We are angry and sad about this loss, but we are most devastated that he chose to give up.

Noah and Lucy never sought perfection from their dad. They just kept hoping for a little effort. If you’re a parent not giving your best effort, all anyone asks is that you try just a little harder and don’t give up. Progress, not perfection, is what your children are praying for.

Our hope for Scott has died, but there is still hope for others. Let’s choose to make this the first time we don’t glorify this tragedy with talk of rock and roll and the demons that, by the way, don’t have to come with it. Skip the depressing T-shirt with 1967-2015 on it – use the money to take a kid to a ballgame or out for ice cream.”

Scott Weiland’s Final Two Video Interviews Available

Scott Weiland’s (ex-Stone Temple Pilots/Velvet Revolver) final two video interviews have been posted online. These were conducted a few days before his untimely death, around his December 1 show in Toronto, ON. Weiland passed away on December 3, as a result of cardiac arrest. R.I.P.

Scott Weiland Dead At 48

According to TMZ, Scott Weiland (ex-Stone Temple Pilots/Velvet Revolver) has tragically passed away at the age of 48. The singer was found dead on his tour bus in Medina, Minnesota, before his band, The Wildabouts, were scheduled to take the stage at the Medina Entertainment Center tonight (December 3). R.I.P.

UPDATE: Rolling Stone has since reported that cocaine was found on the bus, and that Wildabouts bassist Tommy Black has been arrested for possession. As of right now, his death has reportedly been caused by cardiac arrest. It is unknown if drugs were involved, but considering his past substance abuse issues, and what TMZ has been told about his recent drug usage, it is a likely assumption. On another note, you can see footage from his final performance, as well as statements from Stone Temple Pilots and Velvet Revolver below:

Stone Temple Pilots said the following:

“Dear Scott,

Let us start by saying thank you for sharing your life with us.

Together we crafted a legacy of music that has given so many people happiness and great memories.

The memories are many, and they run deep for us.

We know amidst the good and the bad you struggled, time and time again.

It’s what made you who you were.

You were gifted beyond words, Scott.

Part of that gift was part of your curse.

With deep sorrow for you and your family, we are saddened to see you go.

All of our love and respect.

We will miss you brother,

Robert, Eric, Dean“

Velvet Revolver also commented:

“We are deeply saddened to learn of the loss of our old friend and bandmate, Scott Weiland. We experienced a good chunk of life with Scott, and even in his darkest times, we all had hope and love for him. His artistry will live on, of that there is no doubt.

Deepest condolences and sadness are for his children, Noah and Lucy.

We all travelled around this world together on tour; our band, wives, and kids… and we grew to a big family that still remains to this day. It’s just so sad and brutal from any perspective.

Rest in peace, Scott.”