Linkin Park Digitally Release New Deluxe Edition Of “Minutes To Midnight”

Linkin Park have digitally released a 15th anniversary deluxe edition of “Minutes To Midnight.” You can find that on the service of your choice HERE.

“Minutes To Midnight” Deluxe Edition Track Listing:

01. “Wake”
02. “Given Up”
03. “Leave Out All The Rest”
04. “Bleed It Out”
05. “Shadow Of The Day”
06. “What I’ve Done”
07. “Hands Held High”
08. “No More Sorrow”
09. “Valentine’s Day”
10. “In Between”
11. “In Pieces”
12. “The Little Things Give You Away”
13. “No Roads Left”
14. “Across The Line”
15. “Given Up” (Third Encore Session)
16. “What I’ve Done” (Distorted Remix)

In other news, “Minutes To Midnight” has also been certified 5x platinum by the RIAA. Three singles from the record have also received new certifications including “What I’ve Done,” which has gone 6x platinum, “Bleed It Out,” which has gone 4x platinum, and “Given Up,” which has gone platinum.

Mike Shinoda On Linkin Park: “There’s No Tours, There’s No Music, There’s No Albums In The Pipeline”

During a recent livestream on Twitch, Mike Shinoda offered a new update on Linkin Park. He said the following:

“The only Linkin Park news I have for you is that… Yeah, we talk every few weeks — I talk to the guys, or some of the guys. And there’s no tours, there’s no music, there’s no albums in the pipeline. Okay, so let me just tell you that. So just keep in your minds that that is not happening. I’m just gonna say that much for now. I say that because anytime the band says anything or does anything, everyone tries to start up the hype train, and we’re, like, ‘No, no, no, no. Don’t start up the hype train.’ You’re gonna disappoint yourself. Don’t do that.”

[via Blabbermouth]

Linkin Park’s “Numb” Surpasses One Billion Streams On Spotify

Linkin Park’s “Numb” has officially surpassed one billion streams on Spotify. This news comes after “In The End” previously hit that milestone last year. It also comes after the music video for “Numb” previously surpassed one billion views on YouTube in 2018.

Mike Shinoda Says Linkin Park Don’t Have The “Emotional And Creative Math” Worked Out To Return

During an appearance on “Tuna On Toast With Stryker,” Mike Shinoda was asked about the possibility of a Linkin Park reunion. He responded by saying that the band still don’t have the “emotional and creative math” worked out to make a return following the tragic death of Chester Bennington.

Shinoda said the following:

“For me, I’m like, okay physically I could still tour. That part’s good. Hopefully that doesn’t change any time soon. But now is not the time [for Linkin Park‘s return]. We don’t have the focus on it. We don’t have the math worked out. And I don’t mean that by financially math, I mean that like emotional and creative math.”

He also dismissed the idea of touring with a hologram:

“Negative a million percent. I hate the idea of doing a Linkin Park hologram thing. It’s awful.”

[via Metal Hammer]

Linkin Park’s “In The End” Surpasses One Billion Streams On Spotify

Linkin Park’s “In The End” has officially surpassed one billion streams on Spotify. This news comes after the music video for the track previously surpassed one billion views on YouTube. “In The End” appears on the band’s 2000 album “Hybrid Theory.”

Linkin Park, DragonForce, Chthonic, Etc. Members Speak Out On Anti-Asian Violence And Experiences With Racism

As part of a new piece for Heavy Consequence, members of Linkin Park, DragonForce, Chthonic, Sinergy, and more recently discussed anti-Asian violence and their experiences with racism. You can find the full article HERE and read some excerpts below.

Mike Shinoda (Linkin Park):

“In general, just not having any Asian role models in music meant I didn’t have anyone to look up to in that way. But more specifically, our A&R once asked us to stop using a certain logo because it ‘looked like a sticker for an Asian car club.’”

Herman Li (Dragonforce):

“I remember doing a show with Atreyu, on an off day during Ozzfest, and someone threatened me and wanted to beat me up after the show was over. There was no real reason, it was just outside in the carpark.

“There aren’t that many Asian guitar players, Chinese [guitar players], it’s even less. Another experience, before Dragonforce got big, I used to get phone calls at my house almost every single day, sometimes at 4:00 a.m., sometimes at 7:00 p.m., of someone making a funny accent and insulting me and just prank calling me and it went on for months. I had to get the police involved, they couldn’t trace the number.

“All of these things that happened, but I was able to channel that energy to make a stronger self and to make Dragonforce more successful. I think the metal scene is in denial of racism in it. I have so many crazy stories but we don’t really talk about it and when I do interviews I’m not ever asked about it because they think it doesn’t exist.”

Freddie Lim (Chthonic):

“In 2013, when we toured the U.S., there were allegedly Chinese students who sent threatening letters to our booking agent and tour manager saying they will kill us when we’re onstage — that was a bad experience. But we decided to go on with the show and not give a shit about them. It could have been Chinese students studying in the U.S. or hired hands by the Chinese government – we’re not sure if it’s really Chinese students or not [who wrote the letters].”

Kimberly Goss (Sinergy):

“Recently I had someone tell me to, ‘Go back to North Korea you f**king gook’ in a direct message on Instagram. I remember one time on tour with another band I played in, some guys were harassing me outside the venue, mocking some Asian accent and laughing at me. Then they saw me onstage and asked for my autograph after the concert. I looked at them and did the same mock-Asian accent and said, ‘I no understand you.’ In person, it was rare, but online I definitely used to read comments from people referring to me with Asian slurs. They usually got shut down pretty fast by other fans, though, so that restored my faith in humanity.”

[via MetalSucks]

Linkin Park Release 100 Gecs’ Remix Of “One Step Closer”

Linkin Park have launched a new series of remixes inspired by their 2002 remix album “Reanimation.” The first track in the series, a remix of “One Step Closer” that was done by 100 Gecs, can be found below. Linkin Park commented:

“Keeping the #HT20 celebration going into 2021 will be a series of new reanimated tracks. Part of the spirit of ‘Reanimation‘ was to take the ‘Hybrid Theory‘ songs that people knew so well, and let innovative artists flip them in ways nobody expected.”

Funko To Release “Pop! Albums” Figure Based On Cover Art For Linkin Park’s “Hybrid Theory”

Funko will be releasing a “Pop! Albums” figure based on the cover art for Linkin Park’s “Hybrid Theory” in honor of the record’s 20th anniversary. The figure is expected to be released in late January and it can be pre-ordered HERE.

Linkin Park’s Mike Shinoda: “Hair Metal Felt Like Very White Music And I Was Growing Up In A Very Diverse City So I Didn’t Gravitate To It”

While discussing the 20th anniversary of “Hybrid Theory” with Metal Hammer, Linkin Park’s Mike Shinoda said that he felt like there was a lack of diversity within rock music until nü-metal came onto the scene. He also added that this was especially true of hair metal, which “felt like very white music.”

Shinoda said the following:

“At the time, if you asked somebody what they were listening to they’d say… ‘Rock. I listen to hip hop. I listen to jazz.’ It wasn’t until five years later they’d say, ‘Everything’. ‘Hybrid Theory‘ did some of that work. It was part of the progression towards breaking down boundaries between styles of music.

I listened to 90% rap music, then I’d look at a lot of rock bands and I’d be like, ‘There’s something too white’ [about it]. That was one of the things that turned me off, especially hair metal. Hair metal felt like very white music and I was growing up in a very diverse city so I didn’t gravitate to it. That didn’t resonate with me. And it wasn’t just about race. I don’t mean the color of skin. I just mean the culture of it. When nü-metal started at the very beginning, it was a very diverse place.’

“There was a moment when that term, nü-metal and what it meant, was actually pretty cool. It’s almost impossible to imagine! I remember when Korn first came out and when Deftones’ first couple of albums came out, and whatever you think about a group like Limp Bizkit, their first album was really raw. There were all these groups like Snot and (hed)p.e., and it wasn’t smart music, but there was something really visceral and culture blending that was important.”