Metallica Working On Orchestral Version Of “Nothing Else Matters” For Upcoming “Jungle Cruise” Movie

During a recent interview with Collider, Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich revealed that the band are working on an orchestral version of “Nothing Else Matters” for the upcoming “Jungle Cruise” movie. That film stars Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and Emily Blunt and it is currently set to be released on July 30, 2021.

Ulrich said the following:

“It really goes back to [Disney production president] Sean Bailey, who is a lifelong rock fan, and is just all-around one of the greatest, most friendly, generous, warm, and embracing people you’ll find in the music business. I think he’s always been a Metallica fan, and we’ve gotten to know each other well.

My wife and I are big Disney fans, so there’s a great friendship there, and he’s always looked for the right match where there was a way that Metallica could contribute to some project of theirs. This was the right fit, with Sean leading the calvary, and with James Newton Howard and his track record, and what he’s done.”

He also added:

“James Newton Howard, the man, the myth, the absolute legend! Considering what’s he’s done, it’s an absolute honor to have done this with him, and we’re excited for the world to hear it.

It’s kind of an interesting morph, because it’s kind of — and I don’t want to give too much of it away — but it’s a very unusual morph in that it’s kind of his arrangement of ‘Nothing Else Matters‘ that we’re playing.

We wrote the song, but he took the song and rearranged it to fit something specific in the film — and obviously, I’m not going to give any of that away — but we then kind of took on his version of it. I think that’s all that should be said.”

Lars Ulrich Says Metallica Are Hoping To “Get Back Into Another Bubble” This Fall To “Write And Play And Maybe Even Record”

During a recent interview with NME, Metallica’s Lars Ulrich talked about working on new material amid the coronavirus pandemic. According to the drummer, the group are hoping to “get back into another bubble” this fall to “write and play and maybe even record.”

Ulrich said the following when asked if the shutdown has been creatively productive:

“I’m not sure — it’s not easy, but we’ve been doing what we can. We’ve been exchanging ideas back and forth.

The hardest thing about being in four different spaces is that there’s no software that can have us all play in real time to reach other. So I can play something and send it to the next guy and then he can play on it and he can send it to the next guy, or vice versa, but we can’t play at the same time so it takes the impulsivity and the momentary energy out of the occasion.

I’ve talked to some people in technology about how close we are to being able to all play in real time with each other, but that hasn’t been cracked yet. If it is, we’ll maximize it, but for now, we’re in this bubble for a couple of weeks, and we’re looking forward to seeing if at some point this fall, we can get back into another bubble where we write and play and maybe even record — so we’re looking forward to the possibilities on that one.”

He also added the following after being asked when fans can expect new music:

“Not soon enough! Right now, I’d say the hardest thing about all this is trying to plan, because five minutes later, those plans change — that’s just the nature of the state of the world at the moment and we’re going to have to accept and surrender to it. I think it’s a good reminder of the fragility of the world and how maybe we should occasionally pause and be a little bit more respectful and appreciative of what we have and understand how quickly it can derail in terms of how we arrogantly expect everything to be way we wanted as a human race.”

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Lars Ulrich Reveals His Favorite Metallica Song

During a recent interview with GQ, Lars Ulrich revealed that “Sad But True” is his “all-time favorite” Metallica song. The drummer said the following about that:

“‘Sad But True‘. I just love playing that song. I play it a little differently each time. I love the tempo and giving it a different interpretation every time I play it.”

KnuckleBonz To Release New “Rock Iconz” Statues Of Metallica In Early 2021

KnuckleBonz will be releasing new “Rock Iconz” statues of Metallica next year. The figures are based on the band’s “Hardwired…To Self-Destruct” era and they are expected to be released in January or February 2021. The statues are limited to 3,000 pieces and they can be pre-ordered HERE.

Lars Ulrich On The Infamous Snare Drum Sound On Metallica’s “St. Anger”: “I Stand Behind It A Hundred Percent”

Metallica‘s “St. Anger” has received a lot backlash over the years and one of the lead criticisms stems from the sound of Lars Ulrich‘s snare drum on the album. Producer Bob Rock recently offered an explanation for the sound and now Ulrich has addressed it as well saying that he “stand[s] behind it a hundred percent.”

Ulrich said the following on SiriusXM‘s “Trunk Nation With Eddie Trunk”:

“I stand behind it a hundred percent, because at that moment, that was the truth.”

“Just my personality, I’m always just looking ahead, always thinking about the next thing. That’s just how I’m wired. Whether it’s Metallica always thinking ahead, or in my personal life, or in relationships, whatever I’m doing, I’m just always thinking ahead. Sometimes, arguably, I spent too much time in the future, but I rarely spend any time in the past. And so the only time this stuff really comes up is in interviews.

I hear ‘St. Anger‘. That’s a pummeling and a half, and there’s a lot of incredible, raw energy, and it’s, like, ‘Woah!’ It’s been slapped around a little bit. But the snare thing, it was like a super-impulsive, momentary… We were working on a riff. [James] Hetfield was playing a riff in the control room. And I ran up. I was, like, ‘I need to put a beat behind that.’

I ran into the tracking room and sat down and played a couple of beats over this riff to not lose the energy of the moment, and I forgot to turn the snare on. And then we were listening back to it, and I was, like, ‘Wow! That sound kind of fits that riff, and it sounds weirdly odd and kind of cool.’ And then I just kind of left the snare off for the rest of the sessions, more or less. And then it was, like, ‘Yeah, that’s cool. That’s different.

That’ll fuck some people up. That sounds like that’s part of the pummeling,’ or whatever. And then it becomes this huge, debated thing. And sometimes we’ll kind of sit on the sidelines and go, like, ‘Holy shit! We didn’t see that one coming,’ in terms of the issue that it turns into.”

He went on to say that he has no regrets about any of Metallica’s production choices:

“I’m proud of all of those decisions, because I know at that time, they were the truth and it was the instinctive and the right thing to do. And then, 20 years later, it’s, like, ‘Well, how would that have sounded if the snare was on?’ Or, ‘How would that have sounded if we did two instead of four?’

I mean, I don’t know, but I don’t really think about it, to be honest with you, other than when I’m confronted with it in interviews. And I wouldn’t change a thing about the past. Of course, how far are you gonna push that? Of course, yes, bus accidents and things like that, of course. But the point of what I’m saying is I just don’t spend a lot of time sitting there, going, ‘Well, if we hadn’t done that,’ and, ‘If we did this instead…’

I’m just always too busy about what we’re doing next, and that’s just my M.O. And I think all of us in Metallica generally operate like that. So we’re just always excited about the next thing, the next thing, the next record.”

“I say this often, but people always go, ‘What’s your favorite Metallica record?’ My standard answer is, ‘My favorite Metallica [album] is the next one, and the next song we’re gonna write and the next album that’s coming,’ because if you don’t think that your best work is still ahead of you, why do it? And we’re always so excited about the opportunities that lay in front of us.”

[via Blabbermouth]

Bob Rock Explains The Infamous Snare Drum Sound On Metallica’s “St. Anger”

Metallica‘s “St. Anger” has received a lot backlash over the years and one of the lead criticisms stems from the sound of Lars Ulrich‘s snare drum on the album. Now, during a recent interview with “Tone-Talk,” producer Bob Rock finally offered an explanation for the infamous snare.

Rock said the following:

“I’m fine with that [sound]. The thing is, this is interesting, there is a story: while we were doing that [album], we went to their clubhouse; we were in San Francisco, we went to their Oakland place where they rehearsed with Cliff [Burton]. And we had a great time, and Lars told me about his drums, how they were set up in a certain place.

We were looking for inspiration, let’s put it this way, because James [Hetfield] wasn’t there, so I said, ‘Pull off the drums, the double kick’ because we were fooling around with other drums. So he set up the drums in the rehearsal room, we were on our way, and Lars just kept staring at the drums. Finally, he sat behind and said, ‘Just give me a snare drum.’ I had bought a Plexi Ludwig snare because I wanted to try it, and he put it on the drum kit, and he said, ‘That’s the sound.’

And I said, ‘What?’…

So basically, we did a demo, and I used two 58s, a 58 on the kick drum and a couple of whatever simple mics were around, and we did a demo, and that was the sound, and he just would not go back. I’m not blaming him, this was about, basically, if you can wrap around a concept, this was the sound of the drums when they were rehearsing the album, it’s basically the closest to them being in that clubhouse, and no matter what everybody says, it kept the band together, and that inspired them to go on.

So I’m OK with all the flak I’ve taken. It’s a fucking snare-drum sound, give it a break.”

He also added:

“The thing that really made a change in my perspective, as an engineer and producer, was ‘Achtung Baby’ by U2, where they played with the perception of drums. Sometimes you barely hear the drums, sometimes the bass is the loudest thing; in other words, throwing away the rulebook. And part of ‘St. Anger’ is just throwing away the rulebook and saying, ‘Why do we have to set up the drums the same just because what it has to do with metal?’

I was thinking more like ‘Raw Power,’ The Stooges album, and without the solos, there was a band from San Francisco called The Fucking Champs, all they played was riffs spun together like a punk/metal band.

And so Lars and I were talking, and it’s kind of a cool thing, and we just said if you can put a great solo with Kirk, go ahead, and it just never worked.”

[via Ultimate Guitar]

Metallica Exchanging New Music Ideas Through E-Mail & Zoom

Metallica’s Lars Ulrich previously said that the band might work on a new album during their coronavirus downtime and now it looks like things are officially getting started. The drummer recently told Fredrik Skavlan that the group have been exchanging new music ideas remotely as of late.

Ulrich said the following:

“We’re just starting, in the last four weeks maybe, we connected again. We’ve been obviously connecting [even before that], but we [have now] connected creatively, and now we’re sort of in discovery mode, I think is a good way to say it. We are sending ideas to each other via e-mail and via Zoom and [trying to] make music in these unusual situations.”

“We have a weekly Zoom connect. We’ve been doing that basically since [the coronavirus pandemic] started 10 [or] 11 weeks [ago] — since it started in America. So we get together once a week on Zoom for a couple of hours and catch up. The good thing about that catching up is we really just talk about how we’re doing and we don’t sit and talk about Metallica for hours and hours.

But now that we’ve started exchanging some ideas, it’s great. It’s nice to be in touch, it’s nice to be part again of that group, and I look forward to the creative opportunities that lie ahead of us.”

He also added the following when asked what it has been like working remotely:

“So far, at least the sonic side of it and the practical elements are in surprisingly good shape, actually. So now we’ve just gotta figure out how much we can create without being in the same space.

The difference, obviously, between bands like ourselves and people that are still bands, like the U2s of the world or the Red Hot Chili Peppers or Coldplay or Iron Maiden or whatever is that you really are bands, and you rely on the group format to really move everything forward. So unlike if you’re a solo artist and it’s just you and your guitar or whatever. So it’s a different thing.”

[via Blabbermouth]

Metallica’s Lars Ulrich Surprises ICU Nurse On “Jimmy Kimmel Live!”, Says “S&M²” Box Set Will Be Released In August

During last night’s (June 10) episode of “Jimmy Kimmel Live!,” Lars Ulrich surprised pediatric ICU nurse and Metallica superfan Tracey Bednar with VIP passes to a future show and a signed box set featuring the band’s 2019 “S&M²” shows with the San Francisco Symphony. Notably, the drummer also revealed that the aforementioned set will officially be released in August.

Lars Ulrich On Metallica’s Upcoming 40th Anniversary: “Hopefully We’re Just Getting Started”

During a recent chat with Rob Dietrich, the master distiller of Metallica’s Blackened American Whiskey, Lars Ulrich talked a bit about the band’s 40th anniversary, which they will be celebrating next year. The drummer said “it’s crazy” that they are about to hit such a milestone and that he hopes they are still “just getting started.”

Ulrich said the following:

“It always feels like we’re just getting started. Forty fucking years! Yeah, it’s crazy. We’re in 2020 here, so I guess next year is the 40th anniversary.

All those clichés about ‘age is just a state of mind,’ but there is definitely a part of me that still feels like all the best years are ahead of us. I guess that’s kind of how I have always thought.

I can’t spend a lot of time in the past, and I can’t spend a lot of time going down memory lanes. Obviously, when people like you and I are talking or if I’m doing interviews or whatever, I can hang in the past, but when I’m not doing that, I spend most of my time in the future — [focusing on] what’s ahead.

People go, ‘What’s your favorite METALLICA record?’ It’s, like, you know what? The next one is my favorite METALLICA record. So I always think ahead.

But, listen, it’s been an awesome ride so far. Forty years next year, and I’m just thankful for James [Hetfield], Kirk [Hammett] and Rob [Trujillo] and thankful for this incredible ride. And it feels like, I guess, in some peculiar way, that we’re getting closer and closer. I guess social media, the way that we connect with the fans nowadays, still touring all over the world, the spirit and the way we connect with the fans just feels more and more pure, more and more transparent and more and more honest. We just throw it all out there.

I love social media. I love the fact that you and I can sit here and do this. And to me, what rock and roll is is really just about connecting to other people.

When I think of the last three or four years and the ‘Hardwired[… To Self-Destruct]’ ride, it’s amazing how it feels like it’s getting more and more intense and more and more intimate — I guess, always working on trying to break down that barrier between the band and the fans and trying to make us all one. The indoor stage of the last couple of years, playing in the round, with the snakepit, and the shows we’ve played in the last few years outdoors, it just feels like we’re connecting at a more intimate level than we ever have before. So, like I said, hopefully we’re just getting started.”

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@larsulrich + @whiskeyrob chat for this week's #MetallicaMondays 🤘

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[via Blabbermouth]

Watch Metallica Drummer Lars Ulrich’s Sons Cover The Beatles’ “Eleanor Rigby”

Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich‘s sons Myles and Layne recently performed a cover of The Beatles’ “Eleanor Rigby” for their father’s livestream chat with Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff. Lars told Rolling Stone the following about that:

“It was like this insane, three-minute Blue Cheer, crazy, garage-rock version of ‘Eleanor Rigby‘. Obviously, there’s been some incredible versions of ‘Eleanor Rigby‘ along the way, but I’m pretty sure there’s never been one that had this kind of sound, this kind of feel, this kind of energy and madness to it. I was like, ‘You know what, boys? You done me proud.’”