Static-X’s Tour Manager Slams Emmure’s Frankie Palmeri For Calling The Band’s Reunion A “Cash Grab”, Blames Wayne Static’s Widow For His Drug Abuse

Static-X’s decision to reunite for a new album and a “Wisconsin Death Trip” 20th anniversary tour was met with some controversy due to the strained relationship and legal dispute between the late Wayne Static and Tony Campos. Among those that took issue with the reunion was Emmure’s Frankie Palmeri, who recently told the BREWtally Speaking Podcast that it was a “cash grab.” Now, Static-X’s tour manager Eric Dinkelmann has blasted Palmeri for his comments, while also blaming Static’s late widow Tera for causing problems in the band and getting the frontman hooked on prescription drugs.

Here’s what Palmeri originally said:

“If you were to ask me my feelings on the whole idea of them touring without Wayne….I think it’s just crazy. There must be some really bad blood for them to wanna do that.”

“… No one that was a part of Static-X was at his memorial show. There’s no way there was any closure there. So I think that doing the tour and the album without him is just a huge ‘fuck you’ to him probably. That’s what it feels like. It’s very obvious it’s a cash grab, but you can’t get mad at that. It just is what it is.”

Here’s Dinkelmann’s response:

“I’ll just knock out some actual quick *truths* for people seeing as I’ve worked for Static-X since back in 2001:

For credibility purposes I’ll start by stating I met Static-X while I was touring on Ozzfest ‘99. I became friends with the band and started working with them back in 2001 as a videographer for the tour DVD bonus footage. I went on to become band assistant, security, merch designer, Assistant TM, and eventually worked my way up to Tour Manager. I even designed the version of the Static-X logo for Wayne’s solo version of the band, as well as the new current Static-X logo.

Wayne Static wasn’t Static-X. This isn’t a NIN scenario where Trent Reznor is Nine Inch Nails. Static-X was always a partnership and was 50/50 between Wayne + Tony. Wayne never wrote 100% of the music. Sure Wayne was iconic to the band, but it was a collective and a partnership. That is fact and why Wayne needed permission from Tony to use the band name later.

Emmure wasn’t even around during the hay day of Static-X. I don’t remember this guy at a single one of our shows and Emmure wasn’t picking up steam till after Tony + Wayne had their split.

Frankie wasn’t around for any of the shit where Tera was trying to get crew members fired because she was bored or creating problems that actually caused most of our crew to leave and eventually broke up the band.

What Frankie was around for was the actual “cash grab” where Wayne tried to dupe the fans by renaming his solo project Static-X because the solo act wasn’t doing too well. Wayne went to Tony and asked to use the band name. Tony was busy working on other things and terms were agreed upon for Wayne to use the name.

Why doesn’t Frankie talk about that? Probably because Emmure was on one of those tours as main support. Even more coincidentally his band profited from it when Bizarro Static-X pulled off the headlining slot due to “medical problems” (real reason: a drug bust) and Frankie’s band moved to the headlining position.

After this happened Wayne lost a lot of money and upset promoters after pulling out of the tour. With this in mind rumblings of lower guarantees started happening and Wayne wanted to change the financial agreements to use the name. Wayne tried to lie to Tony about why he wanted to change the terms of what Wayne had already agreed to and cut Tony out of what he was owed. Wayne put himself in this position and tried painting Tony out to be the bad guy.

Ah the drugs. There was no rampant use of prescription drugs during the hay day of Static-X. This was something that really didn’t come into play until Tera came into the fold. No one really goes into the fact that the prescription meds that Wayne was on weren’t Wayne’s. They were Tera’s. Tera got Wayne hooked on medication prescribed to her and ultimately those mixed with booze is what killed my friend.

I don’t remember Frankie tearfully calling me to tell me Wayne passed away on the afternoon of Nov 1, 2014 before hit it the internet or press, but I certainly remember Tony + our crew calling me. We were all shattered especially because we didn’t get the chance to mend our relationships because of Tera. As we all know though, you’re not going to come between a guy and his wife if she’s still in the picture.

When you share years with someone you build bonds. Bonds usually are based on mutual appreciation and love. When those feelings are flipped they generally turn to severe levels of animosity because of how much you cared for that person and your relationship. We all loved Wayne. We were all a family.

So when we had our problems, things were intensified by this. We felt betrayed by our brother all in our unique ways/disagreements. That doesn’t mean we stopped loving them. Everyone gets bitter and angry with those we care deeply for. Sadly we all don’t get to mend those broken fences until it’s too late, but that doesn’t mean that’s the way feelings are left. I think everyone deep down realized that.

The reason none of the original crew or band members were at the memorial was because Tera banned us all from attending. Pretty fucked up considering how much we shared with a guy we looked at as a brother, but you’re really not going to make a huge fuss about it at the time and be as classless as her. We loved Wayne. We all cried and went through severe levels of depression when he passed. We all wanted to be there for the Memorial and to do it right.

This previous reason is actually the EXACT reason this tribute is happening. None of the actual band members of Static-X got to say goodbye or have any closure. They have every right to do so and I think it’s a great way to celebrate 20 years of Static-X.

Tony is the only sole surviving member of the band. If he wants to continue touring under the flag he has every right to do so. Bands do this all the time. I guess Alice In Chains + Stone Temple Pilots are assholes in Frankie’s eyes too. Those guys wrote those songs and spent years touring the world playing for fans.

The fact that Tony is including the original lineup is showing he’s trying to be classy about it. If it was a cash grab he could have easily hired cheaper musicians to pocket as much $ as possible. Instead he’s bringing in all the guys who worked on Static-X as well as guys from other bands and is sharing this with everyone.

The most disrespectful thing here is someone like Frankie, who has nothing to do with Static-X, has the audacity to make claims like this and use it as a pedestal. He isn’t *in the know* about anything pertaining to the band much less the facts of what transpired with the actual band members.

But you know I guess anyone will make shocking claims to use as a pedestal to push their own agenda and his solo project for that “cash grab”.

C’mon Frankie, be more responsible with how you use your platform and voice. Don’t slander others on things you actually know nothing about. It’s bad enough we were excluded from saying goodbye to our brother before. Now we have to deal with this nonsense from people in positions that should be a bit more understanding?”

Advertisements

Static-X Announce “Wisconsin Death Trip” 20th Anniversary Tour With DevilDriver & Dope

Static-X’s classic lineup, Tony Campos, Koichi Fukuda, and Ken Jay, will be paying tribute to the late Wayne Static with a “Wisconsin Death Trip” 20th anniversary tour. DevilDriver will co-headline the trek and Dope will serve as support along with other artists TBA. Static-X will be playing a majority of “Wisconsin Death Trip“ with guest vocalists.

Campos said the following:

“Our intention is to pay ultimate respect to Wayne and to celebrate the music that has been in all of our hearts for more than 20 years. It’s all about channeling the vibe from 1999 to the best of our ability and playing those classic Static-X songs live and loud with the fans.”

Fukuda added:

“Rehearsals have been awesome. The music and the vocals are sounding really great! I feel like Wayne would be proud.”

Jay continued:

“We understand that people are naturally going to want to know more about who is singing. We have discussed this at great length and we came to the conclusion that at this time, it would be inappropriate for us to put the focus on anyone other than Wayne, Tony, Koichi and myself. This feels like the best way for us to celebrate Wayne’s legacy, along with the 20th anniversary of ‘Wisconsin Death Trip‘, with all of our fans.”

DevilDriver frontman Dez Fafara commented as well:

“For those who don’t know, I am the one who first discovered Static-X back in the day in a small club in front of about 40 people! From that moment forward, I was and have always been a fan of what they do. It’s unique and will always hold a special place musically for me.

Co-headlining this first memorial tour is not only a way to pay homage to Wayne, but something I’m very excited to do. Static-X will be closing the show each night out of respect for Wayne. I’ll be there nightly, side stage, watching the unit do their thing with a big smile. I hope that Wayne will be there in spirit, watching as his brothers pay respect by bringing this music back to the fans that made the band so massive! I know he would have loved this!

Don’t miss out and grab tickets before these dates sell out! DevilDriver will have a full headlining set and we are throwing in some “surprises”, so get ready to get LOCO! If there was ever a time for me to break out Coal Chamber tracks, this would be the tour to do it on… we will also add new stuff from DevilDriver before our double record comes out in late summer! Come join us for the summer tour of a lifetime!”

Tour Dates:

06/18 Tempe, AZ – Marquee Theater
06/19 Albuquerque, NM – El Rey Theater
06/21 Dallas, TX – Gas Monkey Live
06/22 Houston, TX – The Warehouse
06/23 San Antonio, TX – The Aztec Theater
06/25 Atlanta, GA – Masquerade
06/26 Greenville, SC – The Firmament
06/28 Baltimore, MD – Soundstage
06/29 Sayreville, NJ – Starland Ballroom
06/30 Scranton, PA – Level
07/02 Toronto, ON – Opera House
07/03 London, ON – London Music Hall
07/04 Ottawa, ON – Brass Monkey
07/05 Hampton Beach, NH – Wally’s
07/06 Worcester, MA – The Palladium
07/07 Reading, PA – Reverb
07/09 Pittsburgh, PA – Jergel’s
07/10 Cleveland, OH – Agora Theater
07/11 Indianapolis, IN – The Citadel
07/12 Ft Wayne, IN – Piere’s
07/13 Detroit, MI – Harpo’s
07/14 Lexington, KY – Manchester Music Hall
07/16 Grand Rapids, MI – Intersection
07/18 Cadott, WI – Cadott Rockfest
07/19 Sioux City, IA – Anthem @ Hard Rock Casino
07/20 Joliet, IL – The Forge
07/21 Belvidere, IL – Apollo Theater
07/23 Denver, CO – Oriental Theater
07/26 Los Angeles, CA – Catch One
07/27 Las Vegas, NV – House Of Blues

As previously reported, Static-X are also working on a new album titled “Project Regeneration.” That effort will feature Wayne Static‘s final studio recordings and compositions, as well as a number special guests.

Static-X’s Tony Campos Opens Up About His Strained Relationship With The Late Wayne Static

Static-X’s classic lineup recently announced they were reuniting for a new album called “Project Regeneration” and a “Wisconsin Death Trip” 20th anniversary tour. However, their decision was met with some controversy due to the strained relationship and legal dispute between late frontman Wayne Static and bassist Tony Campos. Now, Campos has addressed those concerns in a YouTube comment on the teaser video for the new album.

Campos said the following:

“A message directly from Tony:

Thank you so much for all of the positive vibes and excitement around what we’re doing with Project Regeneration. I wanted to take a few minutes to personally address some of the questions and misinformation surrounding the dynamics of my relationship with Wayne, particularly towards the end.

It is important for people to remember that I worked, side by side with Wayne, for more than 15 years. He and I shared some of the most amazing experiences of our lives together! We worked together, played together, and helped each other achieve our childhood dreams. Through it all, we developed a friendship that went beyond the band. Together, along with Ken and Koichi, we brought Static-X from the streets of LA, all the way to the main stages of Ozzfest. We made 6 albums together, and shared more on a personal level than I can even put into words.

Several people came and went through the ranks of Static-X throughout the years. Managers, agents, band members, etc. Through everything, I remained a steady partner to Wayne in Static-X. I love the band, and I love the music that we all made together.

Being in a band comes along with many challenges. Success, pressure, expectations, fame, money, personal influences, and egos can all be very divisive factors for people that are working and living in such close quarters for extended periods of time. When you add drugs and alcohol into the mix, it can be very easy to lose yourself, and lose sight of what’s really important.

As time went on, Wayne began to isolate himself from the band. Drugs and alcohol truly began to take over. His personal life became more of the focal point of Static-X, and was on display during band interviews as well as on stage. I found myself in many uncomfortable positions, and began to feel the need to stand up for myself and protect the integrity of the band that we worked so hard to build.

Unfortunately, Wayne and I eventually reached a point where it seemed impossible to overcome our differences. Wayne expressed his intent to go solo, so we agreed to take some time away from one another and to give Static-X a break. Neither Wayne or I quit the band. Our partnership remained intact, while our personal differences kept us from working together.

After some time, Wayne expressed the desire to tour his solo band under the name of Static-X. I knew that it remained impossible for me to insert myself back into that toxic environment, so I reluctantly agreed to give Wayne my blessing to tour Static-X, without my involvement, for a limited time. We both came to a business agreement and we went about our separate lives.

During that tour, some legal troubles involving drugs took place, and ultimately led to cutting the tour short. While Wayne did also have a lingering health issue, it was this incident that ultimately ended the Wayne “solo band” touring as Static-X experiment.

Wayne returned to his solo project and I continued touring with my other projects. We both had hurt feelings. Wayne was angry that I didn’t want to continue on with the way things were and I was angry over how helpless I was to stop any of it from happening to begin with. To make matters worse, we both began vocalizing our unhappiness and our frustrations with one another publicly. I sincerely regret us doing that.

In the end, you can never be prepared to lose someone that you have cared about, so unexpectedly. In my heart, I hoped that Wayne would eventually rise above his demons and that we would reconcile. I was not prepared for Wayne’s passing. None of us were. It was devastating for me. I never got to reconcile with my friend. I never got to apologize, or to forgive to my friend while he was still alive. I never got to say goodbye.

Unless you have unexpectedly lost someone, you may not truly be able to understand what I am expressing. It changes everything. It makes you realize how short and fragile life is, and how lucky we all are to be alive. It makes you replay all of the situations in your head and wish that you could have done things differently. All of that, while having to accept the fact that your friend is gone, and that you will never get to express any of this to them.

The bottom line is:

I miss Wayne. Despite our differences and disagreements, he was my friend for over a decade. He was my brother and my partner. Many of the people that were closest to Wayne in the early years were driven out of his life towards the end. In our own ways, we all did our best to reach him, but we were all powerless to save him.

I wish that Wayne was here, celebrating 20 years of Wisconsin Death Trip with us. I truly believe in my heart, that if Wayne were sober and healthy, and had distanced himself from the negative influences in his life, he’d be doing this with us. I know that Kenny and Koichi feel the same way that I do.

Making this record with Ken, Koichi, and our friends, and bringing this to all of the fans, is the best way that I can think of to express my love, my respect, and my admiration to my old friend. Having personally reached out to Wayne’s family and gaining their blessing, I feel like this is the right way to celebrate and remember who Wayne truly was, and all the good times we had together. This is the send off Wayne deserves.

In closing, I just want to say, I am not interested in rehashing the things that divided us. I am only interested in celebrating the things that brought us all together. I hope this has been a helpful insight. I look forward to bringing everyone together as we celebrate Wayne’s life, and the music we all made together in Static-X.

I thank you all for the love and support!

Tony Campos.”

Static-X To Release New Album “Project Regeneration” Featuring Wayne Static’s Final Vocal Recordings

Static-X’s classic lineup, bassist Tony Campos, guitarist Koichi Fukuda, and drummer Ken Jay, have reunited for a new album titled “Project Regeneration.” The effort will feature the final vocal recordings from frontman Wayne Static, who passed away in 2014. The group are reaching out to vocalists from Disturbed, Five Finger Death Punch, Ministry, DevilDriver, Dope, and Fear Factory to get them to participate in the project as well. Pre-orders can be found HERE. Furthermore, they are also planning a “Wisconsin Death Trip” 20th anniversary tour with special guests.

Campos commented:

“With the 20th anniversary of ‘Wisconsin Death Trip‘ coming right around the corner, it feels like the right time to pay our respects—to the band, to Wayne and to all the fans that supported us right from the start. With the help of longtime Static-X producer Ulrich Wild, the original band lineup of myself, Tony Campos, guitarist Koichi Fukuda and drummer Ken Jay are in the process of completing a brand new Static-X record, ‘Project Regeneration‘.

The album will feature the final vocal performances and musical compositions from Wayne Static. For the unfinished tracks, we’re inviting our friends to lend us their vocal talents to help us complete this very personal project. With the assistance of SiriusXM‘s Jose Mangin, we are in the process of reaching out to David Draiman from Disturbed, Ivan Moody of Five Finger Death Punch, Al Jourgensen from Ministry, Dez Fafara from Coal Chamber and DevilDriver, Edsel from the band Dope, Burton C. Bell from Fear Factory, as well as a handful of others, to see if they can take some time off their busy schedules to help contribute to this project.

In the end, we expect this album to be between 12 and 15 brand new Static-X tracks. It’s the original lineup back together for all the right reasons.”

“‘Wisconsin Death Trip‘ was our biggest record — it set the tone for everything we did from there on out. We’re gonna celebrate the importance of ‘Wisconsin Death Trip‘ with you while we properly pay our respects to our brother Wayne each and every night as part of the 20th-anniversary of ‘Wisconsin Death Trip‘ reunion tour.

Wayne had fans everywhere, so why not do a memorial show for him everywhere. So we’re gonna play a killer, old-school set that features a majority of the ‘Wisconsin Death Trip‘ record, along with all the other old-school Static-X favorites that you all love.

We plan on having a very interactive show with huge LED walls, big sound and lots of production. We wanna make sure that the 20th-anniversary of ‘Wisconsin Death Trip‘ reunion tour happens all over the U.S. Once we get that unlocked, we can focus on the rest of the world…”