Metal Anarchy’s Music In The Age Of COVID-19 Series: Interview With Blood Of The Phoenix

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “Music In The Age Of COVID-19” series, the feature where I discuss the ongoing pandemic with various musicians. This time I have an interview with Blood Of The Phoenix.

METAL ANARCHY: How have you been holding up during the coronavirus pandemic?

BLOOD OF THE PHOENIX: We started writing music for the EP during the pandemic, and collected the current lineup of members…so we’ve been doing pretty good all things considered as a band. On an individual basis, it’s been pretty mixed bag. Some good changes have come of this experience, and some hardships and struggles for sure.

METAL ANARCHY: Have you been using your downtime to work on new music?

BLOOD OF THE PHOENIX: Yes. We’ve recorded our debut EP, recorded a few livestream performances, and have been working on new material intended for a larger release. Bradley has been working on some covers to post as well during his downtime.

METAL ANARCHY: What was the last show you played or attended before the shutdown?

BLOOD OF THE PHOENIX: We hadn’t played any shows before the lockdowns happened. Jess’ last concert attended was Spiritbox; Brad’s last concert was Alexisonfire; Manny played a show in July 2019 with a former project.

METAL ANARCHY: Are you planning to play any livestream concerts during this time?

BLOOD OF THE PHOENIX: Yes. We are planning a livestream event for the release of our debut EP: “From What We Used To Know” on July 2.

METAL ANARCHY: Do you think the live entertainment industry will ever recover?

BLOOD OF THE PHOENIX: Yes – maybe it’s wishful thinking but we believe the industry might do better after the pandemic because people will have not had live music around in so long that it’ll be appreciated a bit more.

METAL ANARCHY: Lastly, is there anything fans can do to help your band or others that may be struggling during this time?

BLOOD OF THE PHOENIX: Yeah, buy merch, buy albums, stream content as much as you can directly from the band themselves. A large portion goes to a “middle-man” of sorts when going through an indirect source.

Metal Anarchy’s Music In The Age Of COVID-19 Series: Interview With Taylor Nordberg (Inhuman Condition, The Absence)

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “Music In The Age Of COVID-19” series, the feature where I discuss the ongoing pandemic with various musicians. This time I have an interview with Taylor Nordberg (Inhuman Condition, The Absence, Goregäng, etc.)

METAL ANARCHY: How have you been holding up during the coronavirus pandemic?

NORDBERG: I’ve been doing alright. I’ve been pretty healthy this last year, and I’ve probably been the busiest I have ever been, so I suppose that’s good too!

METAL ANARCHY: Have you been using your downtime to work on new music?

NORDBERG: Definitely! At the start of the pandemic, Jeramie [Kling] and I did a project where we wrote a song, recorded it, mixed it, and released it all in one day. Then we did that for 12 different metal sub-genres and had it released on Blood Blast Distribution. We collaborated with a ton of friends in different bands around the world, and it was just a fun, intense, “let’s see who’s crazy motivated!”, kind of experience. From that, we formed a punk band called FORE with our buddy Brian “The Canadian Glenn Hughes” Stephenson, and Spiesi (former Kreator bassist) and we play 80s/90s style punk, like Bad Religion, Pennywise, The Offspring, NOFX, etc. We also finished up the new album for The Absence, new music from Goregäng, Jeramie played on the new Ex-Deo album, we obviously finished up this Inhuman Condition album, and 5 additional songs. It’s been crazy busy!

METAL ANARCHY: What was the last show you played or attended before the shutdown?

NORDBERG: We just played our first show this last weekend, actually! We played a crazy club gig with Deicide here in Florida. Before that, Jeramie and I’s last show was playing with Massacre in Peru last February, and Terry [Butler]’s last show was in March with Obituary on the Black Label Society tour.

METAL ANARCHY: Are you planning to play any livestream concerts during this time?

NORDBERG: We haven’t really considered it much, but it could happen. Terry has done a bunch of great livestream shows with Obituary over the last 6 months, but we have been so busy planning the album’s release we haven’t planned any livestreams yet.

METAL ANARCHY: Do you think the live entertainment industry will ever recover?

NORDBERG: I strongly believe it will. It won’t be the same as it used to be, maybe, but music is such an important industry in the world, it’s crazy that it isn’t deemed “essential”. People want music. People want LIVE music. It’s such a positive release for people and I think it’s going to come back in some way, because I know the musicians want it too.

METAL ANARCHY: Lastly, is there anything fans can do to help your band or others that may be struggling during this time?

NORDBERG: Support the bands you love! Now, more than ever, bands need help from their fans. Most bands make their money on tour selling merch, and we have all been out of work for over a year. Many band members support their families from touring so any shirt, CD, or sticker counts. We have shirts, socks, sweatshirts, and hats at www.king-dark.com/collections/inhuman-condition and you can preorder our album on our Bandcamp at inhumancondition.bandcamp.com.

Metal Anarchy’s Music In The Age Of COVID-19 Series: Interview With Murray Acton (Dayglo Abortions)

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “Music In The Age Of COVID-19” series, the feature where I discuss the ongoing pandemic with various musicians. This time I have an interview with Murray Acton of the Dayglo Abortions.

METAL ANARCHY: How have you been holding up during the coronavirus pandemic?

ACTON: All things considering, I’m doing ok. I was on the road with the dayglo’s when it all started last year. Our last show was in Vancouver on a Saturday night and they shut down the bars the next morning. We went back home to the island and within a week they had shut down all but essential travel which effectively disconnected Vancouver Island from the rest of the world. By this time the full impact of my situation had worked its way into my brain. Once I realized that this wasn’t going away anytime soon, I realized that it could very well be the end of my career. I’d been at it for over 40 years and didn’t have much to show for it so I just accepted what fate had given me. I was extremely bummed out it ended that way, but at the same time, I had been very fortunate to see the world, and make so many friends, doing what I loved. I went and found myself a job for the first time in 20 years and worked until December when we had to stop working because of the restrictions being stepped up.

METAL ANARCHY: Have you been using your downtime to work on new music?

ACTON: Well at the beginning I had convinced myself that I was done, but it didn’t take long before the song ideas started piling up in my head. I have a pretty decent little home studio, and a set of Roland V-drumsso I was good to go. I would start as soon as I got home from work. By 12 or 1am I’d have a song recorded. A bit more work to squeeze it into the video format they use on YouTube, then I’d upload it, and hit the hay. More than once I’d get the song online and it would be time for work. I ended up writing about 30 or 40 songs about the pandemic. Then I switched to writing songs for the Dayglo Abortions, and my other band, Stinkhorn. I’ve got an album in the works for both bands. I also recorded a couple of other bands and gave them a high end mix down to see if I could drum up some recording work.

METAL ANARCHY: What was the last show you played or attended before the shutdown?

ACTON: We actually played in Vancouver the night before the shutdown. The crowd was already a bit thin from all the rumours flying around. I tell you it was weird on East Hastings St. the next morning. Not a person on the streets except the junkies all shuffling around. I felt like I had woken up in a zombie movie. Crazy.

METAL ANARCHY: Are you planning to play any livestream concerts during this time?

ACTON: Yeah both of my bands have done a couple now. At our jam spot, there’s a few cameras and we leave our gear miced up so it’s nothing to press record at the beginning of the jam, do a bit of editing, then stream it later on. It turns the practice into a live gig of a sorts, which greatly increases the effectiveness of the practice as a bonus.

METAL ANARCHY: Do you think the live entertainment industry will ever recover?

ACTON: Well I know everyone wants to get back to the “old normal”. I do too. I can’t help but think though…one thing about this world, there is no going back to anything. We will go forward to some watered down version of normalcy, I guess. We might have to fight to get back some of the things that have been taken from us through this, and you know the government won’t be quick to ease off on the all the new powers they have acquired. Plus the big pharma companies are already saying the vaccines could be a yearly thing, and The Americans and the English are hording the vaccines and not allowing companies in the third world (OR cANADA FOR THAT MATTER) to make their own so many countries are way behind on the vaccine. I have heard it will be 2 or more years to get everyone, and as long as it hasn’t been done, it will keep re-immerging in the vaccinated countries. What really pisses me off, is they could have ended this a year ago by using cheap, and very effective anti-viral drugs, but It is quite obvious that the big pharma companies have used their influence to make damn sure they can sell everyone on the planet an expensive as hell experimental vaccine, with no concern for the number of people that die in the process. We really need to stop letting these companies rule our world. They don’t give a flying fuck about our welfare, or even that of their own employees.

METAL ANARCHY: Lastly, is there anything fans can do to help your band or others that may be struggling during this time?

ACTON: Yeah for sure there is. People have been very generous donating money to my Bandcamp page. I have all my music there that people can download for free, but since the pandemic started it seems to be the norm to give me at least a few bucks, and sometimes much more than that. It is greatly appreciated, and it feels really good to get that kind of loving and support. On the road everyone loves you, and the drinks are free. People treat us really good. They buy drinks for us, give us hugs and tell us how much they love us. To go from that straight into a state of near isolation with absolutely zero physical contact shocking and lonely. When someone sticks a few bucks in my PayPal account and tells me they still care, it takes the edge of it a bit.

Metal Anarchy’s Music In The Age Of COVID-19 Series: Interview With Next Stop Olympus

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “Music In The Age Of COVID-19” series, the feature where I discuss the ongoing pandemic with various musicians. This time I have an interview with Next Stop Olympus.

METAL ANARCHY: How have you been holding up during the coronavirus pandemic?

NEXT STOP OLYMPUS: We were mainly just been working behind the scenes getting everything ready for our EP ‘Heart, Mind & Hell’ release, which was released on April 9 so that was at the back end of everything fingers crossed.

METAL ANARCHY: Have you been using your downtime to work on new music?

NEXT STOP OLYMPUS: We’re always working on new stuff however nothing too much because we had sat on the release for quite a while due to the pandemic and we were mainly just focused on the release stored ready and not being able to meet up together can always slow things down a bit because we mainly write together.

METAL ANARCHY: What was the last show you played or attended before the shutdown?

NEXT STOP OLYMPUS: We played a show at the Suburbia in Southampton just before lockdown.

METAL ANARCHY: Are you planning to play any livestream concerts during this time?

NEXT STOP OLYMPUS: We’ve spoken about it but now it’s getting to the point we can play actual gigs again then chances are we won’t.

METAL ANARCHY: Do you think the live entertainment industry will ever recover?

NEXT STOP OLYMPUS: We certainly hope so but it will probably take its time unfortunately, it’s just down to everyone to put the effort into going to shows and everything they can to help it recover.

METAL ANARCHY: Lastly, is there anything fans can do to help your band or others that may be struggling during this time?

NEXT STOP OLYMPUS: Check out our music and every other band’s, buy merch, buy music and just spread the word as much as possible to help all these bands because it’s a lot of time, effort and money in this industry and unfortunately no matter how much passion bands have these parts are required as well.

Metal Anarchy’s Music In The Age Of COVID-19 Series: Interview With Nuclear Winter

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “Music In The Age Of COVID-19” series, the feature where I discuss the ongoing pandemic with various musicians. This time I have an interview with Nuclear Winter.

METAL ANARCHY: How have you been holding up during the coronavirus pandemic?

NUCLEAR WINTER: Things haven’t been too bad really. My main job is doing freelance motion graphics and I used to work from home anyway – so things more or less continued as normal for me. Also fortunately here in Zimbabwe we didn’t have panic buying or heavily imposed lockdowns.

METAL ANARCHY: Have you been using your downtime to work on new music?

NUCLEAR WINTER: I have yes and I’ve managed to finish a new album called “Greystone,” which will be out in May. One song off the album was released in March though – called “The Harvest Moon.”

METAL ANARCHY: What was the last show you played or attended before the shutdown?

NUCLEAR WINTER: In Zimbabwe shows are few and far between but Dividing the Element (local metal band) put on a show a couple of years ago that I went to which was great.

METAL ANARCHY: Are you planning to play any livestream concerts during this time?

NUCLEAR WINTER: I’ve been looking if there’s any possibility of doing that. At the moment I don’t think it will happen but I won’t rule it out completely.

METAL ANARCHY: Do you think the live entertainment industry will ever recover?

NUCLEAR WINTER: I think it will – it may take a bit longer than we expect but I’m sure it will happen.

METAL ANARCHY: Lastly, is there anything fans can do to help your band or others that may be struggling during this time?

NUCLEAR WINTER: The biggest help is from making sales – but for me, I’m happy even if people just share my music.

Metal Anarchy’s Music In The Age Of COVID-19 Series: Interview With Wreche

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “Music In The Age Of COVID-19” series, the feature where I discuss the ongoing pandemic with various musicians. This time I have an interview with Wreche.

METAL ANARCHY: How have you been holding up during the coronavirus pandemic?

WRECHE: Hanging in there. The ceiling fan is still in tact.

METAL ANARCHY: Have you been using your downtime to work on new music?

WRECHE: Oh yeah – working on the Erik Satie Gnossienne & Gymnopedie cycles, a few new solo piano pieces, and of course, I used most of last year to finish All My Dreams Came True!

METAL ANARCHY: What was the last show you played or attended before the shutdown?

WRECHE: I performed with the Handsmade collective (label) for the premiere of the Wreche self-titled film – it was a feature set for “Today at Apple” at their Union Square SF headquarters.

METAL ANARCHY: Are you planning to play any livestream concerts during this time?

WRECHE: Yep! Just rehearsing at the moment- last October, I did several live streams of Wreche’s eponymous album.

METAL ANARCHY: Do you think the live entertainment industry will ever recover?

WRECHE: I think it will blow up- people really want live music back.

METAL ANARCHY: Lastly, is there anything fans can do to help your band or others that may be struggling during this time?

WRECHE: I think supporting the bands you love by buying or rebuying their records- it keeps them confident that the world cares about what they are doing, and it puts some money in their pockets for whatever new projects they’re working on.

Metal Anarchy’s Music In The Age Of COVID-19 Series: Interview With Bushido Code

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “Music In The Age Of COVID-19” series, the feature where I discuss the ongoing pandemic with various musicians. This time I have an interview with Mike Ledet of Bushido Code.

METAL ANARCHY: How have you been holding up during the coronavirus pandemic?

LEDET: Been doing pretty good. I actually had COVID. But I didn’t get real, real sick. I felt crappy for about three days. But I’ve been one of the fortunate ones out there. Lotta people have lost a lot.

METAL ANARCHY: Have you been using your downtime to work on new music?

LEDET: Definitely! We wrote our full length record “The Ronin” and recorded it. COVID gave us the opportunity to slow down a little bit, not willingly of course. But slowing down a little bit and taking a little bit more time in writing and recording has really paid off on this record.

METAL ANARCHY: What was the last show you played or attended before the shutdown?

LEDET: So crazy but it was over a year ago. Winter jam in Reading PA was our last show. It’s even crazier when I say it out loud that we haven’t played in over a year. That means all of our friends‘ bands and all the bands that we love have not played in over a year. How insane is that?

METAL ANARCHY: Are you planning to play any livestream concerts during this time?

LEDET: It’s definitely something we’ve talked about. We want to do a couple quarantine covers. We have some stuff in the works now. I think it’s gonna be pretty cool. Maybe some streams of us playing some of the songs live would be really cool. With us living so far apart it’s really tough to do stuff like that sometimes. But the Internet is an interesting tool! It can do amazing things.

METAL ANARCHY: Do you think the live entertainment industry will ever recover?

LEDET: Yeah I think it will. My hope is that it comes back even stronger than it was before. I hope that people realize and appreciate live music even more. Sometimes you don’t know how good you got it till it’s gone. I know I do.

METAL ANARCHY: Lastly, is there anything fans can do to help your band or others that may be struggling during this time?

LEDET: They sure can! Help us by letting everybody know when you hear a new band that you like. Re-post it on your social media. Tell your friends to do a review, anything like that helps. Also purchase music instead of just streaming it. Buy merch if it’s available online. All of those things can help a band get by. And also for the bands that aren’t signing major labels or anything, keep them inspired to keep writing music. A simple “hey man I really dig your band“ goes a long way.

Metal Anarchy’s Music In The Age Of COVID-19 Series: Interview With The Inferno Doll

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “Music In The Age Of COVID-19” series, the feature where I discuss the ongoing pandemic with various musicians. This time I have an interview with Laura Vargas of The Inferno Doll.

METAL ANARCHY: How have you been holding up during the coronavirus pandemic?

VARGAS: I’ve been keeping myself busy. Writing music, reading books, working on my mindset. I’m a person that normally enjoys being on its own and well, my cats have kept me good company.

METAL ANARCHY: Have you been using your downtime to work on new music?

VARGAS: Oh, yes! Absolutely! All the time. There’s a new album coming so songwriting is something that happens everyday.

METAL ANARCHY: What was the last show you played or attended before the shutdown?

VARGAS: I think it was Amon Amarth, Arch Enemy and Grand Magus. It was a great show!

METAL ANARCHY: Are you planning to play any livestream concerts during this time?

VARGAS: Yes! I’m learning how to set everything up to stream live soon. On Youtube or Twitch. I’ll start testing on my Facebook Group very soon.

METAL ANARCHY: Do you think the live entertainment industry will ever recover?

VARGAS: Yes, I think it will. We are all waiting for live shows to happen again.

METAL ANARCHY: Lastly, is there anything fans can do to help your band or others that may be struggling during this time?

VARGAS: There are so many ways to support your favourite artists: Purchase their albums and merch if you can, if not, stream the music, share it, add it to your playlists, etc. Talk about them with your friends. If there are people out there you think might like what I do, tell them about me. Also, subscribe to the email list. That’s the best way to stay up to date with everything going on when social media doesn’t show you the posts.

Metal Anarchy’s Music In The Age Of COVID-19 Series: Interview With Angelic Desolation

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “Music In The Age Of COVID-19” series, the feature where I discuss the ongoing pandemic with various musicians. This time I have an interview with Angelic Desolation.

METAL ANARCHY: How have you been holding up during the coronavirus pandemic?

ANGELIC DESOLATION: We’ve been doing all right. All of us minus the bassist have kept our employment through this entire thing so we’re definitely pretty fortunate in that regard. We’ve just been keeping busy and not letting this thing slow us down. When the whole world gets shut down it’s too easy to just give up. Seeing as how restrictions are starting to lighten up now, in hindsight it was a good idea to keep the train moving. Any band that didn’t keep themselves busy during this down time will probably be kicking themselves once everything opens up to full capacity again.

METAL ANARCHY: Have you been using your downtime to work on new music?

ANGELIC DESOLATION: Keeping busy would be an understatement. We have a few video productions in the works for release this year along with a dual reissue of our last two albums. Though, instead of remixes or a vinyl release, it is actually a commentary album. It features the vocalist and the guitarist, myself, talking for a few minutes on every track regarding how the song came about and a little bit of history about each one. We’ve also been hard at work on new material as we are five songs deep into our next full length. Ideally, we’re shooting for a 2022 release and as long as we keep cruising along then that should be no problem.

METAL ANARCHY: What was the last show you played or attended before the shutdown?

ANGELIC DESOLATION: The last time that we played live was back in November I think. It was a local only show but it was really killer. The drummer of Extremely Rotten has a new band out of Denver called Venomous Agent and that was their debut show so it was a ton of fun. When you don’t play a show for an extended period of time or even see live music, you truly forget how much you love that experience and it just makes you realize how much you want to get back to doing things again.

METAL ANARCHY: Are you planning to play any livestream concerts during this time?

ANGELIC DESOLATION: We don’t have any livestream concerts planned, but that’s not to say we don’t have video content rolling out. Our live shows tend to get pretty messy with fake blood and gore props so it might actually get censored if we went that route. We’re taking a slightly different approach to the livestream concert idea, but we promise it won’t disappoint.

METAL ANARCHY: Do you think the live entertainment industry will ever recover?

ANGELIC DESOLATION: I’m sure the industry will recover, but to say that it will happen in a timely manner is another thing completely. In America, I’ve seen some flyers for some bigger tours that are planning to come through but simultaneously. I’ve seen some other tours and festivals getting cancelled. Whether I like it or not, I feel like it’s still too early to start planning out year-long tours. It’s already hard enough for a smaller band to plan out a two-week run within our own country so the logistics of a world tour aren’t going to be any easier. As much as we’d all love things to be back to normal, I fear that the music world will still have to wait another year.

METAL ANARCHY: Lastly, is there anything fans can do to help your band or others that may be struggling during this time?

ANGELIC DESOLATION: A band is essentially a small business. The best way to help out the bands that you love is to buy as much merch from them as possible. Whether it’s buying merch, paying for a livestream concert or any other avenue of income, by being an active fan and showing the bands that you love that you still care. That means a lot. If a band or an artist knows that there is still a demand for what they put out then that artist that you love will likely still keep working their ass off to bring you content. If anything, it decreases the likelihood that they will just hang it up. These times are tough for everybody right now, but if you know that your fans are out there and want more from you then it’s a very motivating reason to keep pushing forward.

Metal Anarchy’s Music In The Age Of COVID-19 Series: Interview With Pressure

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “Music In The Age Of COVID-19” series, the feature where I discuss the ongoing pandemic with various musicians. This time I have an interview with Pressure.

METAL ANARCHY: How have you been holding up during the coronavirus pandemic?

PRESSURE: We have used the time to find our sound, approach and our style. We have recorded and will release an album on May 7th. And before that we have released a few singles. We have also recorded videos for all our songs, so it’s been pretty busy times even though the pandemic, but of course we are really tired of it now and want it to end. The hard part is the lack of income during the pandemic.

METAL ANARCHY: Have you been using your downtime to work on new music?

PRESSURE: Yes, that has been our main focus.

METAL ANARCHY: What was the last show you played or attended before the shutdown?

PRESSURE: It was at a small nightclub called Patricia. We met, and got the band together just a few months before the pandemic so we didn’t really have time to do a lot of shows with Pressure.

METAL ANARCHY: Are you planning to play any livestream concerts during this time?

PRESSURE: Yes, we have done a few small ones and of course we will do one when we release the album.

METAL ANARCHY: Do you think the live entertainment industry will ever recover?

PRESSURE: Yes, I definitely do. There are a lot of hungry people out there and they are not ready to give up. Maybe a few people will retire and/or unfortunately have seen their life’s work ruined, but there will definitely be people who want to step up and take their place.

METAL ANARCHY: Lastly, is there anything fans can do to help your band or others that may be struggling during this time?

PRESSURE: Support bands by buying merch, paying for live streams, etc. And of course cheer for their bands and show them that they haven’t forgotten them. If you wanna follow us and listen to us: Instagram, Facebook, website, YouTube, Spotify, and merch.