Metal Anarchy’s Music In The Age Of COVID-19 Series: Interview With Angelic Desolation

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “Music In The Age Of COVID-19” series, the feature where I discuss the ongoing pandemic with various musicians. This time I have an interview with Angelic Desolation.

METAL ANARCHY: How have you been holding up during the coronavirus pandemic?

ANGELIC DESOLATION: We’ve been doing all right. All of us minus the bassist have kept our employment through this entire thing so we’re definitely pretty fortunate in that regard. We’ve just been keeping busy and not letting this thing slow us down. When the whole world gets shut down it’s too easy to just give up. Seeing as how restrictions are starting to lighten up now, in hindsight it was a good idea to keep the train moving. Any band that didn’t keep themselves busy during this down time will probably be kicking themselves once everything opens up to full capacity again.

METAL ANARCHY: Have you been using your downtime to work on new music?

ANGELIC DESOLATION: Keeping busy would be an understatement. We have a few video productions in the works for release this year along with a dual reissue of our last two albums. Though, instead of remixes or a vinyl release, it is actually a commentary album. It features the vocalist and the guitarist, myself, talking for a few minutes on every track regarding how the song came about and a little bit of history about each one. We’ve also been hard at work on new material as we are five songs deep into our next full length. Ideally, we’re shooting for a 2022 release and as long as we keep cruising along then that should be no problem.

METAL ANARCHY: What was the last show you played or attended before the shutdown?

ANGELIC DESOLATION: The last time that we played live was back in November I think. It was a local only show but it was really killer. The drummer of Extremely Rotten has a new band out of Denver called Venomous Agent and that was their debut show so it was a ton of fun. When you don’t play a show for an extended period of time or even see live music, you truly forget how much you love that experience and it just makes you realize how much you want to get back to doing things again.

METAL ANARCHY: Are you planning to play any livestream concerts during this time?

ANGELIC DESOLATION: We don’t have any livestream concerts planned, but that’s not to say we don’t have video content rolling out. Our live shows tend to get pretty messy with fake blood and gore props so it might actually get censored if we went that route. We’re taking a slightly different approach to the livestream concert idea, but we promise it won’t disappoint.

METAL ANARCHY: Do you think the live entertainment industry will ever recover?

ANGELIC DESOLATION: I’m sure the industry will recover, but to say that it will happen in a timely manner is another thing completely. In America, I’ve seen some flyers for some bigger tours that are planning to come through but simultaneously. I’ve seen some other tours and festivals getting cancelled. Whether I like it or not, I feel like it’s still too early to start planning out year-long tours. It’s already hard enough for a smaller band to plan out a two-week run within our own country so the logistics of a world tour aren’t going to be any easier. As much as we’d all love things to be back to normal, I fear that the music world will still have to wait another year.

METAL ANARCHY: Lastly, is there anything fans can do to help your band or others that may be struggling during this time?

ANGELIC DESOLATION: A band is essentially a small business. The best way to help out the bands that you love is to buy as much merch from them as possible. Whether it’s buying merch, paying for a livestream concert or any other avenue of income, by being an active fan and showing the bands that you love that you still care. That means a lot. If a band or an artist knows that there is still a demand for what they put out then that artist that you love will likely still keep working their ass off to bring you content. If anything, it decreases the likelihood that they will just hang it up. These times are tough for everybody right now, but if you know that your fans are out there and want more from you then it’s a very motivating reason to keep pushing forward.

Metal Anarchy’s Music In The Age Of COVID-19 Series: Interview With Pressure

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “Music In The Age Of COVID-19” series, the feature where I discuss the ongoing pandemic with various musicians. This time I have an interview with Pressure.

METAL ANARCHY: How have you been holding up during the coronavirus pandemic?

PRESSURE: We have used the time to find our sound, approach and our style. We have recorded and will release an album on May 7th. And before that we have released a few singles. We have also recorded videos for all our songs, so it’s been pretty busy times even though the pandemic, but of course we are really tired of it now and want it to end. The hard part is the lack of income during the pandemic.

METAL ANARCHY: Have you been using your downtime to work on new music?

PRESSURE: Yes, that has been our main focus.

METAL ANARCHY: What was the last show you played or attended before the shutdown?

PRESSURE: It was at a small nightclub called Patricia. We met, and got the band together just a few months before the pandemic so we didn’t really have time to do a lot of shows with Pressure.

METAL ANARCHY: Are you planning to play any livestream concerts during this time?

PRESSURE: Yes, we have done a few small ones and of course we will do one when we release the album.

METAL ANARCHY: Do you think the live entertainment industry will ever recover?

PRESSURE: Yes, I definitely do. There are a lot of hungry people out there and they are not ready to give up. Maybe a few people will retire and/or unfortunately have seen their life’s work ruined, but there will definitely be people who want to step up and take their place.

METAL ANARCHY: Lastly, is there anything fans can do to help your band or others that may be struggling during this time?

PRESSURE: Support bands by buying merch, paying for live streams, etc. And of course cheer for their bands and show them that they haven’t forgotten them. If you wanna follow us and listen to us: Instagram, Facebook, website, YouTube, Spotify, and merch.

Metal Anarchy’s New Music Showcase: Exclusive Q&A With Dead Defined

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “new music showcase,” the feature where I introduce you to bands that readers of this site may find interesting. This time I have an exclusive Q&A with Craig Ewan of Dead Defined.

METAL ANARCHY: Tell me a little about your band:

EWAN: Dead Defined was formed in 2018 and it is a Pop/Rock/Industrial project. It’s instrumentally written and sang by myself. It is produced and engineered by Mike Dmitrovic of Voodoo Records Canada. It’s more or less an amalgamation of all my favorite styles of music focused into one project.

METAL ANARCHY: Who are your main influences?

EWAN: I have too many music and life influencers to even list, but as far as musical influences, off the top of my head, as far as bands and writing styles go it would be anything from bands like Staind, Filter, Beastie Boys, Theory of a Deadman to legit anything on the other side of the spectrum of Chill/Lo-fi or Melodic tunes at the moment. I’m allover the map when it comes to musical influence these days.

METAL ANARCHY: What is your latest release and why should readers of this site check it out?

EWAN: My latest single is entitled ‘Ignite’. I hope your readers will take the time to check it out as it’s more of an experiential tune on my side. I’m used to writing the four on the floor, hard hitting rock tracks that my fanbase seem to love, but wanted to throw a bit of a curveball on this one since it’s something that really spoke to me music wise. It’s my first track working with just samples and not a full band setup. I want to show diversity in my writing and music style so I thought it was an appropriate time to release this one. So far I’ve had nothing but positive feedback.

METAL ANARCHY: What can people expect when they go to your live shows?

EWAN: High energy fun and lots of fan interaction. I’ve always been the type of performer to lure the crowd into some kind of engagement at my shows. I find it’s such a rush when the audience is wanting to participate and respond during a performance, that’s what us performers strive for. If you’re up on stage and people are just staring down at their phones the whole time, what fun is that from a performance side of things? I want to make them look up and ask “who the hell is this guy?” Positively or negatively ha! At least you’re paying attention.

METAL ANARCHY: Where do you see your band heading in 5 years?

EWAN: I don’t really have a solid answer for that actually. I try not to predict the future too much these days to be honest. I like to focus on the now and try to grow my fanbase and quality of my music in hopes to continue an uphill climb. It’s small steps for me at the moment. The music industry is always evolving now more than ever so it’s hard to predict anything when it comes to wanting a certain outcome in that length of time. Just trying to be a consistent artist in these times is hard enough, but you have to always be striving for more and staying positive!

Metal Anarchy’s Music In The Age Of COVID-19 Series: Interview With Shadow People

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “Music In The Age Of COVID-19” series, the feature where I discuss the ongoing pandemic with various musicians. This time I have an interview with Shadow People.

METAL ANARCHY: How have you been holding up during the coronavirus pandemic?

SHADOW PEOPLE: We have been fine! We all three have held jobs during this time. We’re very fortunate of all that and we have not gotten COVID….yet. The only thing we really looked forward to was our record coming out in March!

METAL ANARCHY: Have you been using your downtime to work on new music?

SHADOW PEOPLE: We have been writing since day 1! Our practices and media have never stopped. It doesn’t stop for us. We would feel convicted if we did not continue. It will never stop. Even if one of us doesn’t make it to practice, the other two still practices. We will not stop.

METAL ANARCHY: What was the last show you played or attended before the shutdown?

SHADOW PEOPLE: Last show was our CD release last March. It was fucking huge but that was right before everything got scary and unsure. There was very little sanity and safety in the world a year ago and we completely used that to our advantage. We miss shows. We miss it but We do not play shows right now because we CARE about the people who care about us.

METAL ANARCHY: Are you planning to play any livestream concerts during this time?

SHADOW PEOPLE: Not a livestream necessarily. We’ll film a live set and put it up the next day. It’s not necessarily “LIVE” like at the moment. But we keep up. You kinda have to if you still want to stay relevant. All that’s very important to the people who like your band.

METAL ANARCHY: Do you think the live entertainment industry will ever recover?

SHADOW PEOPLE: We do. People want to see shows! That will never go away. There’s shows happening right now. We just choose not to participate because we don’t want anyone getting the virus. We would have guilt about that. Obviously this virus won’t go away over night so things will slowly go back to full swing. When there’s no fear of going out anymore, there’s going to be a lot of love to Go around for bands and venues.

METAL ANARCHY: Lastly, is there anything fans can do to help your band or others that may be struggling during this time?

SHADOW PEOPLE: Buy records! Buy the fuck out of records. It’s our livelihood. Half the living was making money at the door to go to the next show. Now that shows don’t happen anymore, musicians need their merch bought. Buy it. You wanna help? Buy someone’s 5 dollar record. That itself means more than you will ever know.

Metal Anarchy’s New Music Showcase: Exclusive Q&A With Holding Poison

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “new music showcase,” the feature where I introduce you to bands that readers of this site may find interesting. This time I have an exclusive Q&A with Holding Poison.

METAL ANARCHY: Tell me a little about your band:

HOLDING POISON: Although we’ve known each other for years, Lockdown 2020 was the kickstart the project needed and the opportunity to finally work on a music project together. Matt found himself thinking of the most productive way to utilize the downtime and decided to bring some of the demos he’d been working on to life. With Jack’s help, this became a reality pretty quickly with the EP taking shape within a matter of a few months.

METAL ANARCHY: Who are your main influences?

HOLDING POISON: As a band, we have quite a vast array of influences, so the key thing for us is capturing that in our music.

METAL ANARCHY: What is your latest release and why should readers of this site check it out?

HOLDING POISON: Our Debut EP- “By a Thread” – is our latest release! It features 5 very different tracks, dynamically more so than anything. The opening 2 songs are quite attacking – Sitting Duck & By a Thread. Then you have Curbside which has a John Mayer vibe in the verse with a Nirvana vibe in the chorus. Losing Grip is the most commercial song out of the bunch, with its really catchy chorus and then you have Tick Tock – the last track on the EP. By far the most dynamically laid out track with thunderous guitars coming at you in the chorus.

METAL ANARCHY: What can people expect when they go to your live shows?

HOLDING POISON: You won’t have a second to stand still. It’ll be 100mph from start to finish, kind of what you’d expect from a hard rock band!

METAL ANARCHY: Where do you see your band heading in 5 years?

HOLDING POISON: Who knows! The main thing is we write and release music we enjoy and that other people can enjoy too. What follows after that we will leave to the imagination!

Metal Anarchy’s Music In The Age Of COVID-19 Series: Interview With Hand Of Kalliach

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “Music In The Age Of COVID-19” series, the feature where I discuss the ongoing pandemic with various musicians. This time I have an interview with Sophie and John Fraser of Hand Of Kalliach.

METAL ANARCHY: How have you been holding up during the coronavirus pandemic?

JOHN: We’re doing alright thanks! Whilst it has certainly been a grim few months, we actually only started Hand of Kalliach due the pandemic restrictions – being stuck inside with instruments and a lot more free time was a good prompt to get writing the music we’d been thinking about for some time.

SOPHIE: The band was born because of the pandemic as a way for us to channel some of our rage and stifled creativity. We’ve found it to be a lifeline in these weird times.

METAL ANARCHY: Have you been using your downtime to work on new music?

SOPHIE: Absolutely, we’re working hard at the moment on a new album. We’ve really strived to distill the best elements from our existing tracks into it, and as a result this album is a lot more focussed than our debut EP. So far we’re really enjoying making it.

JOHN: Yes, we’ve really tried to refine the sound whilst keeping all the power, atmosphere and aggression that got us positively reviewed from our debut EP last year.

METAL ANARCHY: What was the last show you played or attended before the shutdown?

SOPHIE: We actually managed to catch the Dropkick Murphys which played in an old theatre not too far from Edinburgh, it was awesome!

JOHN: Yeah, it was really fantastic, that seems like a very long time ago now… Definitely miss the venues, looking forward to getting back!

METAL ANARCHY: Are you planning to play any livestream concerts during this time?

JOHN: We haven’t live streamed yet but are definitely looking into it – the challenge is it’s just the two of us, so without some backing tracks or other musicians we might struggle a little… but definitely exploring options.

SOPHIE: The pandemic has made us far too used to being at home, and it would be a great challenge so we are definitely keen to give it a shot!

METAL ANARCHY: Do you think the live entertainment industry will ever recover?

JOHN: It’s definitely been a dire time for musicians and venues, no question. However, longerterm we’re quite optimistic that things will bounce back, possibly even stronger than before as a resurgent crowd looks to make up for lost gigs – in our view, music, and metal in particular, will always be something that is best enjoyed live, and we think there will be a huge level of enthusiasm for gigs returning once vaccines are circulated and infections are under control.

SOPHIE: It’s hard to imagine being at a gig, surrounded by people but yet it’s all we can think about. Not being able to experience live music has made us realise how important it is, it’s good for the soul and I think when we’re able people will rush back.

METAL ANARCHY: Lastly, is there anything fans can do to help your band or others that may be struggling during this time?

JOHN: In the digital age, the support bands receive from streaming and some digital music sales are generally very bleak – if you want to help your favourite bands out, particularly the smaller independent ones, then buy their merchandise or physical music, Bandcamp is fantastic for that sort of thing and it really helps. Buying one single t-shirt can provide a band with as much cash as if you streamed their album literally thousands of times!

SOPHIE: And if you’re listening to something and you love it – tell the band, it never gets old and it really makes our day!

Metal Anarchy’s Music In The Age Of COVID-19 Series: Interview With King Bong

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “Music In The Age Of COVID-19” series, the feature where I discuss the ongoing pandemic with various musicians. This time I have an interview with King Bong.

METAL ANARCHY: How have you been holding up during the coronavirus pandemic?

KING BONG: It’s been quite hard for our band: our music has a strong improvisational element, so we need live interaction. We’ve been working on a new project in the intervals between lockdowns, but we don’t know when we’ll be able to record it because it needs a bit of rehearsing and we’re going into lockdown again.

METAL ANARCHY: Have you been using your downtime to work on new music?

KING BONG: We have actually recorded something! For us it’s a first: as I said, we’ve always needed to play live in order to interact with each other while we improvise. This time we exchanged tracks via email like most bands do but we were also able to retain a bit of improvisation. The sound is quite different from what we usually do, so we’re very happy about it. We’ll probably publish the fruits of our lockdown experiments by the end of 2021.

METAL ANARCHY: What was the last show you played or attended before the shutdown?

KING BONG: We played a show on 2/14/2020, just two weeks before Milan shut down for the first time. Our latest attended shows were actually the same for the whole band: we saw SunnO))’s three-day residence in Paris at the end of January 2020. Both events feel like they happened in another lifetime!

METAL ANARCHY: Are you planning to play any livestream concerts during this time?

KING BONG: We just started talking about it: we aim to do something before summer, lockdowns notwithstanding.

METAL ANARCHY: Do you think the live entertainment industry will ever recover?

KING BONG: That’s very hard to say at the moment. Assuming we ever get this virus under control, I honestly have no idea how much time it’ll take to get back to big gatherings. Huge bands will be able to invest a lot of money and they’ll resume touring, but I don’t know what will happen to smaller bands and the industry around clubs. We’ll have to recover from all the clubs that have closed, the workers that have moved to other industries and so on.

METAL ANARCHY: Lastly, is there anything fans can do to help your band or others that may be struggling during this time?

KING BONG: Sure, they’re the same things we should always be doing, not just during a pandemic: look around you and help those that are struggling, give money to charities, donate clothes and food and bring the people around you to do the same. Most cities have collection points for donations of every kind, directed at helping those workers whose industry is currently on hold because of the emergency.

More specifically, in several countries you can donate to organizations that are helping show business workers. And for bands, you can go on BandCamp and buy albums and merchandise directly from musicians. Keep an eye on BandCamp Fridays, when they wave their transaction fees and all your money goes directly to the artist. We can’t’ go to concerts, so I re-invested part of that money and my record collection has been expanding at an alarming rate!

Metal Anarchy’s Music In The Age Of COVID-19 Series: Interview With TDW

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “Music In The Age Of COVID-19” series, the feature where I discuss the ongoing pandemic with various musicians. This time I have an interview with Tom de Wit aka TDW.

METAL ANARCHY: How have you been holding up during the coronavirus pandemic?

TDW: Mostly just by making things as I always do. I am lucky because I work from home and have the studio in my house, so I can literally sit down and write a new song in a day and produce it as well. I have spent many years building my studio also for work purposes, but it’s in these Covid times that I feel extra happy that I did, because I am not dependent on others to express myself creatively.

However, it is tough. Life in general is weird right now due to lockdown rules and the distance that we all feel between one another. I have had my bad moments as well and right now the financial situation is not perfect, but I also know that the bad times will pass. We have to grit our teeth and appreciate the good things when they can happen again I reckon. And while this is happening I just try to be in touch with as many people as possible to stay social and stay connected.

METAL ANARCHY: Have you been using your downtime to work on new music?

TDW: Yes actually. Also I released my new album this year, so in a way musically I am just as busy as I always am. Right now I am actually working on a new TDW album (songwriting is happening as we speak) and the new Dreamwalkers Inc album (Also in songwriting phase) so I am actually writing up a storm of music and that is what keeps me going and sane.

There’s many things I cannot do right now, but at least by doing this I can feel a sense of accomplishment and satisfaction when I can finish a song.

METAL ANARCHY: What was the last show you played or attended before the shutdown?

TDW: That was a festival called Complexity Fest in February of 2020 which is an amazing progressive music festival in The Netherlands that really books a wide variety of crazy music ranging from atmospheric black metal to weird avant-garde electrocore and everything in between. Was a great weekend of friends, music and vibes and I miss that a damn lot.

METAL ANARCHY: Are you planning to play any livestream concerts during this time?

TDW: Not right now, as with the band Dreamwalkers Inc we are really preparing a new album with a partial new lineup and we would need rehearsal time to really get good enough to get back on stage again. Personally I am okay with that for now. Rather focus on getting a lot of good material ready and then get back on stage well prepared. If Covid and livestream gigs are still a thing then, then we can consider it!

METAL ANARCHY: Do you think the live entertainment industry will ever recover?

TDW: Yes, but it is going to be a long road to get back to what we once had. I think the world needs to learn a few really important economical, environmental and personal lessons from this time we are going through right now and that obviously also impacts the way the entertainment industry has to function. I am not a fortune teller though, so my guess on what will happen is as good as yours.

METAL ANARCHY: Lastly, is there anything fans can do to help your band or others that may be struggling during this time?

TDW: If you have money to spare, please BUY MUSIC and do it directly from the artists. It legitimately helps. For example, my music is self released, so when people buy the records (also from stores and/or distro’s) it will end up with me and I will use it to keep making more stuff. It’s not about wanting to make an income to pay for my housing and/or food (I have my external studio work for that) but every penny I make with record and merch sales, goes back into making the next product sound, look and/or smell as good as possible!

Metal Anarchy’s New Music Showcase: Exclusive Q&A With Mental Torment

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “new music showcase,” the feature where I introduce you to bands that readers of this site may find interesting. This time I have an exclusive Q&A with Mental Torment.

METAL ANARCHY: Tell me a little about your band:

MENTAL TORMENT: Mental Torment was formed in Kyiv, Ukraine in 2009 by Anatolii, Mad (ex-vocals), Mykhailo and Yaroslav. We started our first rehearsal in Anatolii apartments, tried to play some song drafts. Later, Angelus (ex-bass) and Bohdan (ex-drums) joined the band and we played our first show in 2010 (Summer Solitude Evening). After a few more shows, including Doom Over Kyiv (Saturnus, Mournful Gust, Autumnia, Vin de Mia Trix) Oleksii (ex-bass), Andrii(drums/bass) and Yevhen(ex-keyboards) joined the band and we recorded and released our first full-length album in 2012. To promote the album, the band embarked on their first tour in 2013 with Letargia band over 3 countries. After the tour band took a long pause, some members took part in different bands/projects. And in 2020 we decided to come back. During this year were recorded new songs for an upcoming album. This will be the debut for Roman, our new Vocalist. Hope everyone will enjoy our new work.

Today Mental Torment are:

Anatolii Doroshenko – Guitars
Andrii Avramets – Bass
Artur Myrvoda – Drums
Mykhailo Chuha – Lead Guitars
Roman Sagajdachnyj – Vocals
Yaroslav Mosiievsky – Keyboards

METAL ANARCHY: Who are your main influences?

MENTAL TORMENT: For sure, all roads go to Black Sabbath, if we speak about music influence. And there are no doubts about it. But the main trigger to start everything was a huge desire to evolve Ukrainian extreme metal music to leave a mark within its history.

METAL ANARCHY: What is your latest release and why should readers of this site check it out?

MENTAL TORMENT: You can check out our first Album “On The Verge” on all existing platforms. This is a good old school Death-Doom metal and majestic guitar parts framed by light keyboards, rich atmosphere, which take you deep under menacing sea rudiment.

New release “ego:genesis” will include 7 tracks and cover the catharsis that a person goes through in a moment of despair and hopelessness, searching for answers to eternal questions, resisting the inevitable and final acceptance of their fate. The album will bring a fresh view on the traditional Doom Metal genre. From acoustic ballads and funeral vibes to sludgy and modern progressive music.

METAL ANARCHY: What can people expect when they go to your live shows?

MENTAL TORMENT: Loud and kickass metal act. Depressive and melodic, slow and monumental.

METAL ANARCHY: Where do you see your band heading in 5 years?

MENTAL TORMENT: We see our band in BDSM latex suits, saving our planet from intergalactic sausage invaders (joke). Today everyone is facing hard times, and, of course, everything is changing so fast, that no one could be sure about what will be happening tomorrow.

Metal Anarchy’s Music In The Age Of COVID-19 Series: Interview With ORCumentary

Time for the next edition of Metal Anarchy’s “Music In The Age Of COVID-19” series, the feature where I discuss the ongoing pandemic with various musicians. This time I have an interview with ORCumentary.

METAL ANARCHY: How have you been holding up during the coronavirus pandemic?

ORCUMENTARY: Could be much worse. I’m dealing with the isolation in my own way, like everyone else. I’m fortunate to have been employed through the pandemic though, and I’ve kept my health.

METAL ANARCHY: Have you been using your downtime to work on new music?

ORCUMENTARY: Yep! I just put out a new album, titled “Fully ORChestrated” on February 5th of this year. Everything getting shut down actually helped me stay focused and push myself really hard to make the album the best it could possibly be.

METAL ANARCHY: What was the last show you played or attended before the shutdown?

ORCUMENTARY: The last show I attended was Thrice (playing Vheissu in full), which was February 2020. The pandemic didn’t disrupt any of my own show plans, as I had planned to spend 2020 working on a new album anyways. My last in-person live show was Summer 2019.

METAL ANARCHY: Are you planning to play any livestream concerts during this time?

ORCUMENTARY: I did my annual Super Bowl Alternate Halftime Show livestream during the televised halftime show this past February. It is still available to view on my YouTube channel. I would like to do another livestream show this year, but there are no solid plans at the moment.

METAL ANARCHY: Do you think the live entertainment industry will ever recover?

ORCUMENTARY: Depends on how we define “recover”. Live events will happen again, but it’s hard to think venues will ever get to the capacity they did pre-pandemic. I’m sure many people will not feel comfortable being part of big crowds again and will stay away from certain types of events. This will negatively impact artists for sure, and you’ll probably see them tour less and maybe do more livestream shows instead.

METAL ANARCHY: Lastly, is there anything fans can do to help your band or others that may be struggling during this time?

ORCUMENTARY: The best way to help any artist is to purchase music and merch directly from them (my link: www.orcumentary.bigcartel.com). Not everyone is in great financial shape now, of course, but there are many free ways to support, including posting on social media and streaming on Spotify and YouTube.