Every Time I Die & Cave In To Cover Each Other’s Songs For Upcoming “Splitsville” Livestream

“Two Minutes To Late Night” have announced a new livestream series called “Splitsville.” The show will find various artists covering each other’s songs and it will kick off on January 29 with Every Time I Die and Cave In. Tickets can be found HERE. “Two Minutes To Late Night” commented:

“Listen up nerds, we’re stoked to welcome ya’ll to Splitsville: our new recurring live stream where we get two bands we love to cover a song from each other’s catalog. It’s a video homage to the classic 7” vinyl cover splits of the past. This first Splitsville is going to be between Massachusetts space rock legends Cave In and Buffalo hardcore party kings, Every Time I Die. Their song choices will remain a mystery until the premiere of the stream – even from each other! The stream will also feature exclusive crossover/mashup merch for both bands you can only buy during the 24-hour stream. Splitsville will stream at twominutestolatenight.bandcamp.com on January 29th at 8pm EST for 24 hours. Pre-order your tickets now! Huge thanks to hate5six for loaning us footage for this extremely professional sizzle reel. Be sure to follow and support them!”

Every Time I Die Share Footage From Night Two Of Their 2019 ”Tid The Season” Event

Pro-shot footage of Every Time I Die’s December 14, 2019 set at their “Tid The Season” event in Buffalo, NY has been shared by hate5six. You can watch that below. If you missed it, footage of their December, 13, 2019 set at the event is also available HERE.

Every Time I Die Premiere New Songs “A Colossal Wreck” And “Desperate Pleasures”

Every Time I Die have premiered two new songs, “A Colossal Wreck” and “Desperate Pleasures.” Keith Buckley said the following about those:

“[The tracks are] two sides of the same reactionary coin. While ‘A Colossal Wreck’ looks around at the current state of the world and says ‘life is a punishment and only the worst of us thrive,’ ‘Desperate Pleasures’ takes a more optimistic approach and renounces the nihilistic/accelerationist attitude of the voice that came before. It says that without hope, even in the face of such universal anguish, only death is certain and to give up now when those around us need it most is a treacherous act of pure cowardice. That said, I’m not sure which is worse, being a coward or being a cynic. Probably a coward. At least cynics have a sense of humor.”

Every Time I Die Announce “Online Telethon Extravaganza”

Every Time I Die will be hosting a special “Online Telethon Extravaganza” on December 19. Tickets for the virtual event can be found HERE. Steve Micciche commented:

“Alllmost forgot what fun was til we put this together. We play, we laugh, we laugh cause we’re broke. We play a new song. We got celeb’s. We got @BillyGeeee killing it on this Christmas Carol vibe. Have fun with us & put this year behind us. December 19th. https://tidathon.com

Keith Buckley Says Every Time I Die’s New Album Is A Return To “Lighthearted, Jovial Lyrical Content”

During a recent appearance on The Peer Pleasure Podcast, Keith Buckley talked a bit about the new Every Time I Die album. According to him, fans “that got into ETID because of the lighthearted, jovial lyrical content” will “get that back in spades now.”

Buckley said the following:

“…We actually have a new record recorded. We wrote and recorded it, and then two weeks later, the pandemic hit. So, we’re just sitting on it, but we’re not going to do anything with it until we can tour again, because it deserves… You know, I mean everyone’s everyone’s music deserves to be toured on, if they put everything into it that they, you know, hold sacred which is what you try to do when you’re in a recording studio.

So we we don’t want to just like throw it into the into the furnace of online content that gets absorbed and quickly shit out while people are binge watching shows and, you know, trying to find ways to distract themselves from the truth that the you know the world is, you know, pretty much dilapidating around us.

But uh yeah, so were hoping that the band start touring again soon. But I will say that, like, the writing for this album. And I was very, very, very fucking excited about touring on this album, because it’s just such a different album as far as like the attitude of it. I was very excited to realize that I kind of got back to the playfulness of old ETID, you know. So I do feel like this is this is on par.

I mean I honestly, I honestly honestly feel like this is the best record and after we did ‘Low Teens‘, I was like, ‘okay, there’s no chance I’m ever going to write like this again’ and I feel like ‘Low Teens‘ was the first time anyone really took me seriously as a writer, because there was no, you know, no like cheap humor in it, you know none of those like devices that I use, because they were fun.

It was just very serious and I found a way to to appropriately translate what I was thinking and going through. And a lot of people recognized that. And it was, as far as what I saw about like reviews and things it was, you know, this is his…. these are his best lyrics.

So I knew that I was never going to top that and I was like if I know I’m not going to do that, then why why would I even do another record? Like I just I can’t imagine having an experience that’s going to inspire lyrics that could be more of what that is, you know? And I don’t I don’t think I want to. So I don’t know if there’s a point to doing it.

So I kind of argued, you know with myself, about that as an internal conflict, but I was like okay fuck it. I’m in a band, bands make make records, well let’s fucking make a record. So I did and, you know, sat down to start writing and found out that I was having fun with it again, music was fun to me again.

So, I think that anybody that got into ETID because of the lighthearted, jovial lyrical content or anything that miss that from ‘Low Teens‘, get that back in spades now.

I think it’s just so much better than any of our other records and it feels like a new band again. Which is wild, because the last record was about a birth and, you know, it was very much a rebirth of us too and this is our first. This is our first offering after that rebirth, so it feels like a brand new band to me. I’m really excited to get back out there.”

[via The PRP]

Every Time I Die Post New Teaser For “Planet Shit”

Every Time I Die have posted a teaser for their new song “Planet Shit.” The track, which the band previously performed live, is expected to appear on their upcoming album.

Parkway Drive Announce Rescheduled Australian Dates With Hatebreed & Every Time I Die

Parkway Drive have postponed their Australian tour with Hatebreed and Every Time I Die due to the coronavirus pandemic. The trek will now take place in 2021. Here’s the new dates:

07/01 Brisbane, AUS – Riverstage
07/03 Sydney, AUS – Qudos Bank Arena
07/09 Melbourne, AUS – Melbourne Arena
07/10 Adelaide, AUS – AEX Theatre
07/13 Perth, AUS – HBF Stadium

Every Time I Die Share Another Tease Of New Music

Every Time I Die have posted another teaser for one of the songs off their upcoming album. You can check that out below:

Keith Buckley Says Every Time I Die’s New Album Is Inspired By The Trump Administration & “Universal Uncertainty”

During an interview with Alternative Press, Keith Buckley opened up about the lyrical inspiration for the new Every Time I Die album. According to him, the effort is inspired by the Trump administration and “universal uncertainty.”

Buckley said the following when asked what inspired the lyrics on the new record:

“The Trump administration coming into power. And I know some people prefer to keep politics out of music, but in one way or another, politics inform everything we value. It’s not a cat you can put outside for the day.

Its arms reach into art, music, literature, our careers, our neighborhoods, our family structures, our access to essential goods and services, everything.

But OK, let’s pretend it is possible to set aside the political implications of the current Trump administration. Take away all policy-making ability and media coverage. What you have now is a demographic of human Americans forging an identity from the absolute worst and most dangerous resources they possess because they saw one evil man’s rise as validation of the idea that “evil” can take what “good” cannot earn.

To people rightfully tired of being shit on by those in charge—bosses, wives, husbands, “the coastal elite,” whatever—the idea of a sudden and newly “acceptable” power grab seemed too good to be true.

So they built an identity around their darkest parts, the ones they’ve had to repress as part of our social contract but no longer need to. I imagine it felt like taking your bra off after a long day of work.

With this now in play, the game is on as to who can be the worst in the shortest amount of time, which is why the internet blossomed like a corpse plant. Innumerable grifters raced to the bottom by pandering to hate, jealousy, bitterness, fear and confusion through self-destructive contrarianism.

Intentionally duplicitous bullies operating in abject bad faith who use not instinct or courage to guide them through their lonely, miserable lives but the outrage they revel in when they conflate “bravery” with “shamelessness” and “the righteous anger of the marginalized” with “arbitrary violence” because they delight in pain and cruelty and cannot even comprehend how empathy functions.

You don’t need to hang out in political circles or listen to political podcasts to know that supporting the Trump administration is a question of human decency, of morality. Seeing how such brazen stupidity and heartlessness affects people who just want to follow their own bliss and love whoever they want to love and provide a better life for their families, it disgusts and angers me.

But I’m not so blinded by that anger that I can’t recognize a symptom of helplessness when I see it. This spoiled, delusional preteen of a country has failed the people it was supposed to protect and made us feel so worthless that there are actually those of us who don’t believe that we deserve things like Medicare For All. And even if they do, it’s not enough to have. Others must have not.

The short version: I didn’t think I’d ever be able to write better or more charged lyrics than what I wrote for Low Teens, but that record was about personal uncertainty. This one is about universal uncertainty.”